Pezze e Piselli

Pezze e Piselli, by Briana Elizabeth

I am big on plans. I’m not big on following them to the letter of the law, but I do think they help us aim well, and that’s the most important thing. If you’ve followed us for any amount of time, you know I love a good Bullet Journal. Why? It’s inexpensive, it doesn’t need battery backup, you can’t lose it in a crash (my iMac recently crashed, and we had to wipe it. I did not have an external hard drive for backup, alas). You can set it on fire, but that’s another post. (I do have friends who set theirs aflame after the year is done as a marker of a new year to come and a goodbye to the last. An interesting way to mark time, no?)

Anyway, that time is upon us. If you’ve put off planning, don’t worry, you can still write a few things down to order your mind and days.

Here are some links I collected for you.

Why Bullet Journaling works.  How a Bullet Journal might work for you.  An interesting way of prioritizing our work.  How the Ivy Lee method is working for Jen of Viking Academy.  Jen from Wildflowers and Marbles has free printables to help you organize. She also has a page specifically for planning, with printables, helps, and ideas to help your year go  more smoothly.

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If you’re setting up a seasonal table for your littles and picking books for a Morning Basket, here are a few wonderful titles with lovely illustrations. The Year at Maple Hill Farm  and Our Animal Friends at Maple Hill Farm both by Alice and Martin Provensen.
I loved this beeswax snail tutorial from Frontier Dreams and this felted pumpkin from Hinterland Mama. For olders, one of my favorites is always A View from the Oak. And you really must follow Lynn on Exploring Nature with Children because her watercolor journaling videos are so encouraging and beautiful.

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For older kids, this time of year is harder – at least at my house. Marching band camp is over, practices have started, football is all over my schedule, and choir is starting back up, which leads me back up to the bullet journaling in the beginning of the post. It keeps my head on straight and my people fed. The days of morning baskets and nature tables are long over at my house, and I miss them, but these older student days are so filled with new and beautiful things. I am trying to hold onto afternoon reading this year, but this may be the year we bid a fond farewell to that also. Older children…they have to be given their own leisure time. Time to build, discover, learn in very different ways than the younger children. It’s also a quieter time because they need their privacy about studies and accomplishments. Finding the balance is tricky and a daily tension, but growing like this is a part of being a homeschool parent.

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Happy Schooling, all.


Briana Elizabeth has been at this homeschool gig since her 23 year old son was in 7th grade, and his psychiatrist told her that he had to be homeschooled. Her son never went back to public school that year, and the following year, she pulled her 4th grade daughter out of public school. Her five other children have all been homeschooled entirely. It was baptism by fire, but she wouldn’t trade it for the world. Through the years, she has in the end, not only educated her children, but herself, and homeschooling has brought about a whole paradigm change of living for her family. The education that had seemed only possible for the elite was possible through classically homeschooling.

 

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News and Notes

Patches and Peas, by Briana Elizabeth

Another Christmas has come and gone, and a new year has started. Some years we’ve easily picked back up with schooling, and other years it’s been terribly hard, almost to the point of feeling like we were brand new homeschoolers, and not veterans. It’s a comforting thing to get back to routine, as much as it is to celebrate.

What really helps me with changes like that (which I forgot this year) is music. It’s so simple, but music as a transitional tool is amazingly effective. I’m a person that normally has music playing quietly in the background all the time, but this year, once the Christmas CDs and records were tucked away to wait another year, I forgot to go back to the school music standards that we always listen to. Just like when I put my apron on to start my work day (do you use an apron? You should! Voila, it’s time for business. If you’re lucky, like me, you have your Nana’s aprons.) I also put music on in the school room. Nothing modern, nothing obtrusive, but just a quiet, beautiful melody in the background that is familiar, and says, “Now is the time to work.” For us, it’s Treasures of English Church Music. If I remember correctly, I purchased it because Memoria Press recommended it for learning Latin (do you have their Lingua Angelica? It’s wonderful, truly) , and it was just so beautiful, it became a constant in our lives. Bach is another one of my favorites. Another mentioned to me is from the Benedictines of Mary, Queen of the Apostles titled Angels and Saints. If you can get to a library sale, they normally have classical CDs for pennies. Grab some. Go through them, find your favorites, or last but not least, find the classical station on the radio. They might complain at first, but I promise they will grow to love it. And they will learn to love beautiful music, too.

A lot has been going on in the Sandbox. We’ve added some new authors, and we took this month to republish some oldies but goodies. Vera’s The Baby is the Lesson  is always a great reminder that homeschooling isn’t just about school, it’s about life. If you have been wanting to start a foreign language, or just need some encouragement, Lynne’s Foreign Language at Our House is a must!

Also, not that you need reminding, but if you’re in the Northern Hemisphere, it’s almost February. Which means that there could be a February Slump. The good thing is that it’s not just you, it happens to a lot of us, and forewarned is forearmed. Prepare! Rely on some Hygge, and plan on packing it all up for the day and sleigh riding, ice skating, or museum visiting. Force some cherry branches, or forsythia. Do a Winter Pond Study. Spring will come. And don’t forget to ‘like’ us on Facebook, or sign up for automatic e-mail updates so you don’t miss a post!


Briana Elizabeth has been at this homeschool gig since her 23 year old son was in 7th grade, and his psychiatrist told her that he had to be homeschooled. Her son never went back to public school that year, and the following year, she pulled her 4th grade daughter out of public school. Her five other children have all been homeschooled entirely. It was baptism by fire, but she wouldn’t trade it for the world. Through the years, she has in the end, not only educated her children, but herself, and homeschooling has brought about a whole paradigm change of living for her family. The education that had seemed only possible for the elite was possible through classically homeschooling.

News and Notes, Newsletters

October Pezze e Piselli, by Briana Elizabeth

Pezze e Piselli is Italian for “patches and peas.” It’s a bits and pieces dish that gets thrown together with whatever pasta bits were leftover from the making of the dough. It was the first thing I thought of when our editor Tammy asked me to revive the long-neglected newsletter and tuck it into a Thursday post for the blog. Who can say no to Tammy? Not me.

Some of these links you’ll remember from the Facebook page. (Have you friended us? You should! We try to make it as relevant and as fun as we can!)

This piece titled The Joyful, Illiterate Kindergarteners of Finland by The Atlantic was floating around, and it sparked a lot of questions. Many of us remember kindergarten as a lot of play time interspersed with cutting and pasting and a story or two. We all know that the case is much different now, and we should ask, is that better?  The links within the article are noteworthy as well, so be sure to check them out. It also lined up with this article we shared on Delaying Kindergarten.

We thought this styrofoam cup trick for teaching place value was pretty cool!

One of our authors Jen Naughton wrote a great blog post on what might make a good Norse Myth reading list. It ties in well with this article, Hygge: A Heartwarming Lesson from Denmark.

You might really agree with this list of 10 Things Homeschoolers Wish They Could Say.

If your house is anything like mine, Halloween costumes have been chattered about for the last weeks, and finalizing of pumpkin carving images has happened. Don’t forget to save some seeds for roasting! 

Not to rush you, but November is coming up fast. My family celebrates Martinmas if we can. Here are some links to ponder and get you thinking about what kind of lantern you can make. I’ll post more about that later, too, just in case you forget.

Finally, some posts from STS that were particularly talked about: Georgiana opened her heart and wrote on Homeschooling Through the Hard Times.  And Slow and Steady reminds us all to really ponder how fast we have to work at homeschooling. Is faster always better?

And last but not least….

Giveaways

Back to Homeschool With Sandbox to Socrates: News and a Giveaway!

Have you made your curriculum choices, shopped for school supplies, planned your extra-curriculars, and stocked up on chocolate for Mom? For those of us following a traditional school year calendar, it’s Back to Homeschool Time!

Here at StS, we’re kicking off the school year with some new features and a giveaway!

Firstly, we hope you like our new LOOK! Our logo was created by our Photo Editor, Apryl Herrell. We are all so pleased, and so thankful that Apryl shared her talent and created the perfect design for StS.

Secondly, we have a new FORUM! Sometimes it’s hard to chat on a blog, but we do want to hear from our readers and get to know you, so we created a new home here at StS for those conversations. We envision a friendly, intimate community where we can all help each other in StS’s sleeves-rolled-up style, sharing experiences and discussing everything from preschool nursery rhymes and naptimes to college admissions processes for homeschooled teens. All are invited to this inclusive gathering of parents who have one thing in common: We are classically educating our children at home.

Thirdly, we have a new STORE! Do you need a tote bag or a travel mug? Would your children like t-shirts about homeschooling like this one

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or would they enjoy announcing to the world that they will be able to outrun zombies if it ever comes to that?

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If you’d like to support StS, please have a look at our CafePress store. Our art department frequently adds new designs so check back often, and of course anything can be ordered with StS’s original new logo.

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Finally, we have a GIVEAWAY! One lucky winner will receive this travel mug from our store, because homeschooling parents spend a lot of time driving, and because most homeschools are fueled by coffee. You need this travel mug.  CLICK HERE TO ENTER!

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Thank you for reading here at Sandbox to Socrates. We have great plans for the future as we try to encourage you as you homeschool your children! Please join us on our forums, and don’t forget to enter the giveaway!