Review: Intermediate Language Lessons Level 3/Grade 6, by Tammy

 

My sixth-grade son had just finished two semesters of rigorous writing and grammar study, but I didn’t want him to lose the knowledge he’d gained over the summer. Intermediate Language Lessons Level 3 by Emma Serl seemed like a good way to review without feeling like hard work. Grounded in the Charlotte Mason method of teaching, ILL is gentle, yet thorough, instruction in writing and grammar. Cynthia Albright has reformatted ILL into a printable workbook for the child to write in, instead of copying the entire lesson by hand. For my pencil-phobic boy, this was a godsend.

Intermediate Language Lessons includes nature study, poetry, vocabulary, art study, grammar and usage lessons, and more. The lessons are short but effective. Mrs. Albright has included lined pages to be printed for dictation exercises. Because ILL was originally  printed in the Victorian era, Mrs. Albright has updated the postal codes and state abbreviations in the pertinent places. The one drawback, from my point of view, is that there is no teacher instruction available from the original printing. Mrs. Albright indicates that she is working on one (and has written teacher’s guides for Levels One and Two). When the teacher’s guide for Level 3 is finished, I will gladly buy it.

Like many boys, my son is not a fan of writing. The PDF format is ideal for him because we can print what’s needed – i.e. the dictation pages – and use the other pages on our iPad using the Notability app*. The app allows him to write on the “page” and delete errors, and then leave it for Mom to check. This saves on printer paper and ink, erasers, and frustration.

ILL Part 3 on iPad

Pros:

  • Charlotte Mason method – narration, copywork, dictation, grammar
  • PDF – print all at once or as needed
  • Multi-pronged approach to language arts – nature/art study, grammar, writing

Cons:

  • No teacher guide/answer key for Level 3 — if the parent isn’t familiar with CM-type instruction, this program is more difficult to implement (not impossible; just more difficult)
  • Vintage pictures – my ultra-modern son had to learn to look past the pictures

Verdict: If your heart is drawn to the gentle yet thorough instruction of the Charlotte Mason method, I highly recommend Intermediate Language Lessons Level 3 for sixth grade. This PDF program will be a blessing to your homeschool.

*There are other apps that allow you to annotate a PDF on the iPad. Notability is the one I’m most familiar with.

Disclaimer:  I received a free copy of this product in exchange for my honest review on the Sandbox to Socrates blog. Opinions expressed in this review are my own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Sandbox to Socrates blog. I received no compensation for this review, nor was I required to write a positive review. This disclosure is in accordance with the FTC Regulations.

Tammy lives in the desert southwest where antelope play in her front yard, grazing among the rattlers and scorpions. She enjoys reading, scrapbooking, and crochet. She currently  homeschools one son.

Even More Science Apps, by Jen W.

Homeschooling With Technology

by Jen W.

Each day seems to bring more education-related apps for the iPhone, iPad, and Android platforms. However, not all of these are created equal. Here are some apps that my kids and I have found to be of great use as study tools or as methods of demonstration. It’s worth noting that there are many science apps that serve as little more than vehicles for flashcards or quiz questions; all of the apps on this list have more substance than that.

 Life Science:

  •  12979204503_02ee7056d6_s HudsonAlpha iCell (iPad, Android): This app gives students a 3D, easy-to-rotate view inside the three basic cell types: animal, bacteria, and plant. While viewing a specific cell type, students can tap the parts of the cell, which both zooms in on the part and provides a brief description. It provides three levels of knowledge: basic, intermediate and advanced. Basic is good for elementary (or lower level readers) while the intermediate and advanced are good for middle school through very basic college-level biology. I highly recommend this app as part of learning about cells and/or while working on microscope skills. It could use more information, such as the fact that a cell might contain thousands of organelles or show the internal structure of the mitochondria.
  • 12959942533_327553031e_s  D. Bones (iPad, Android): This is a great app for learning all about the skeletal system. It has three modes: a text that provides information about each bone in the body; in puzzle mode, students drag and drop parts of the skeleton with three different levels of difficulty; finally, quiz mode tests  students on their knowledge base using two different levels of difficulty. My only complaint is that it can a little hard to tap exactly where the app wants you to.
  •  12959862334_399813e5be_s Biology – Plant Handbook HD (iPad, Android): This is a wonderful high school level app designed to teach students about the biology of plants. It teaches about leaves, dissection types, flowers and more. There is also a free version that gives limited access, but could give you an idea of what this app is like before paying for it. Biology – Plant Handbook (free)
  • 12959863774_dc549a74db_s  Froguts Frog Dissection HD (iPhone, iPad, Android, Kindle Fire): This is a very realistic view of a frog dissection. It has male and female specimens and provides both dissection and 4 different practicum modes. It can be used either to help walk a student through a hands-on dissection (which is preferable to my mind) or could be used as an alternative to actual dissection (especially for those students for whom dissection might cause an ethical dilemma).
  •   12960082953_caf8cf0c31_sDK The Human Body App (iPad): This multi-award winning app is an amazing reference guide containing over 270 zoom-able illustrations, detailed videos, story pages and a testing tool. It covers all 12 systems of the human body: “integrated body, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, skin, hair & nails, lymphatic & immune, digestive, urinary and reproductive.”

Earth Science:

  •  12960215463_ace9aa1707_sBack in Time (iPhone, iPad, Windows 8): This app gives an astounding view of the universe, allowing students to travel back in time to the moment of how scientists believe the Big Bang happened, through the vast stretch of time until the present day. There are animations, videos, timelines, and articles that discuss various phenomena. The one drawback to this app is that it takes up a lot of memory (over 600 MB), but the upside is that you don’t need to access the internet for the app to remain functional.
  • 12959577473_b668eea0f7_s Folds and Faults (iPhone, iPad, Android, Kindle Fire): This is a simple app that teaches students about the various types of folds and faults found in rock layers. It is a great little geology tool, especially if you are visiting an area that allows students to observe these in real life. It doesn’t have incredible depth or substance, but that is probably expected with its low price point.
  •  12959861594_fa38bfbc07_sWater Cycle HD (iPad): This is an audio-visual presentation of the water cycle. It includes photos, videos, and a Bloom’s taxonomy-based quiz function. This is one of the few apps in this list designed with younger students in mind.
  •  12959428475_a72b092a53_sSolar Walk (iPhone, iPad): This is another multi-award winning app. It serves as a 3D model of the solar system. You can view the galaxy as a whole, moons of other planets, interesting artificial satellites orbiting the earth, or a host of other databases. There are so many features available within this app that they are impossible to list in this short blurb.

Physics:

  • 12959862534_fd8ec85a94_s Monster Physics (iPhone, iPad): This app allows students to build and operate various types of vehicles. They must use their vehicles to complete over 50 different “missions.” Monster Physics Lite (free)
  •  12960646975_d88467148b_sBuilding Serial Circuits (iPad): Students will learn about circuits via 3D graphics and 2D symbols. They will build various types of circuits using wires, switches, batteries and light bulbs. This would be a great supplement or prelude to a similar hands-on activity. Building Serial Circuits Lite (free)
  • 12960646975_d88467148b_s  Building Parallel Circuits (iPad): Using 3D graphics and 2D electronic symbols, students will build simple parallel circuits by using wires, batteries, switches, and light bulbs. By constructing their own closed circuit with two light bulbs, they will develop a deeper understanding of series and parallel circuits and discover that electricity follows the path of least resistance. Building Parallel Circuits Lite (free)
  • 12959864634_ccb7c13a14_s Coaster Physics (iPhone, iPad): Students learn about physics while building roller coasters. You can create and ride all sorts of roller coaster tracks while learning how speed, acceleration, energy and g-force change at different points in the track.

Chemistry:

  • 12959577613_0479a3d14d_s  The Elements: A Visual Exploration (iPhone, iPad): This is a beautiful reference that takes students on a visual journey through the period table. You can read about each element and see a visual sample.
  •  12959429115_182c363938_s Molecules (iPhone, iPad): This app allows students to view and manipulate 3D models of various molecules. They can download simple or complex molecules as they need to view them. The one downside to this app is that it would be nice if there was a better catalog of available molecules that students could explore.
  • 12959864904_27138afc22_s  ChemLab (iPhone, iPad): This app tests students’ knowledge of chemical compounds in a fun setting. If you are creating carbon monoxide, then you must add one carbon and one oxygen to the formula. Get it wrong and things go “boom!” While formulas are given after the fact, a pre-knowledge of chemical formulas would be useful.
Jen jen_wW.– Jen is born and bred Sooner who has spent twenty years following her military husband around the world. Jen started on her homeschooling journey when her eldest daughter learned to read at three years old, and she decided that she couldn’t screw up kindergarten that badly. That child is now a senior in high school, and they have both survived homeschooling throughout. Jen has two more children who are equally smart and have also homeschooled all along.