Memoria Press Review by Tammy: Geography I

I received a copy of Memoria Press’ Geography I to review for Sandbox to Socrates. I’ve never used any Memoria Press materials but knew their curriculum to be of excellent quality, so I was excited to see what they offered for beginning geography. Geography I is part of their fourth grade curriculum and includes a review booklet for United States geography which is covered in their third grade program. Geography I retails for $48 and includes a student text, student workbook, and teacher’s manual (as well as the US review books).

 

My son (6th grade) and I have always studied geography in conjunction with history, and I was loathe to change that just for a review. So instead of starting at the front of the book and working our way though, we picked out countries that we had already studied and moved into new countries as they came up in our history. Each region in the student text begins with an overview and is then broken down into individual countries. We covered Ancient History last year, so we did a read-through of the Middle East: The Cradle of Civilization and discussed the map. Then we read the North Africa overview and did the workbook pages on Egypt. We moved on to Europe and read about Greece and Italy, completing those workbook pages. Each country is given a two-page spread and includes History’s Headlines (very distant past) and Tour of Today (more recent past), as well as a Fast Facts section and a map of the country in relation to its region (surrounding countries and geographical features). We moved on to Spain, France, Great Britain, and Germany as we discussed them in our history studies. We were able to connect each country with our history lessons via History’s Headlines and discuss more current events with Tour of Today. This piecemeal approach might not work for every family, but it was a fun change for us.

 

Conclusion: Geography I is a quick and easy way to cover a bit of history and learn a few facts. I like that can be as independent as your learner allows. My son was able to complete the pages himself, allowing me to come back for discussion when convenient. Geography I makes a great jumping-off point for students to delve further into a country of particular interest. It isn’t flashy or colorful, but the content is solid and useful.

Be sure to read what our other reviewers had to say about this and other Memoria Press products.

Disclaimer:  I received a free copy of this product in exchange for my honest review on the Sandbox to Socrates blog. Opinions expressed in this review are the opinions of myself or my family and do not necessarily reflect those of the Sandbox to Socrates blog. I received no compensation for this review, nor was I required to write a positive review. This disclosure is in accordance with the FTC Regulations.

Tammy lives in the desert southwest where antelope play in her front yard, grazing among the rattlers and scorpions. She enjoys reading, scrapbooking, and crochet. She currently  homeschools one son.

Memoria Press Review by Emma: Geography I

I have always loved Geography and so was excited when the time came to start teaching Geography to my kids. Life has been rather hectic this last year, so I really needed something independent and easy to use. I was happy to get a chance to review Memoria Press‘s Geography I.

photo by Ove Topfer

My eight year old used Geography I mostly independently.  I received the Teacher’s Guide, the Student Text, and the Student Workbook.  He would read through the Student Text and then answer the questions in the Workbook. After finishing the page, I would check his answers, and we’d discuss anything I had questions about. We would also Google some of the countries he was most curious about, and look them up on our world map.

▪Pros:  The fact that this was an independent lesson was great. It gave me the break I needed to take care of other matters but didn’t feel like busy work. I knew that the information would be presented well, and he would learn some facts about each country. I also used it as writing practice, since he had to fill out information about each country.

▪Cons:  The lack of color and visual appeal were the biggest downfalls, in my opinion. This curriculum gives a basic overview of each country and presents everything in a neat little package, but I would have liked for the pages to be more visually appealing with more images and color.

Conclusion:  I plan to continue using Geography I as a supplement to our Geography studies and will likely purchase the next levels. I enjoy the independent aspect and the straightforward approach.

Be sure to read what our other reviewers had to say about this and other Memoria Press products.

Disclaimer:  I received a free copy of this product in exchange for my honest review on the Sandbox to Socrates blog. Opinions expressed in this review are the opinions of myself or my family and do not necessarily reflect those of the Sandbox to Socrates blog. I received no compensation for this review, nor was I required to write a positive review. This disclosure is in accordance with the FTC Regulations.

emma

Emma–Emma has been married for seven years, and is mom of two, plus one once-crazy dog. She’s been homeschooling for three years now in NC. In addition to being a wife, mom and educator, she is also a Graphic Designer.

Memoria Press Review by Kristen: Geography I

 

Geography has always been a tricky subject for our family.  I want to make sure that our kids are familiar with the basic locations of countries and land formations, and I want them to be able to follow any political discussions that deal with countries that aren’t their own.  Beyond that, I hope they leave our home knowing every country and people group bring something special and unique to the world and that no area is the sum of its generalizations.   These desires have always led me to geography curricula that is very hands-on, involved, and requires a lot of my teaching time.  We enjoyed it, yes, but as the kids get older I have found myself wishing for something that was less hands-on and more fact-based.  I was very pleased, therefore, to be offered an opportunity to review Memoria Press’s Geography I this spring.

  • Method:  I use Geography I with my daughter, nine, as an independent subject.  We have the Teacher’s Guide, the Student Text, and the Student Workbook.  Twice a week she sits down and reads through one chapter of the Student Text and then answers the questions and fills out the map in the Student Workbook.  When she finishes, I come and check her work and then I have her tell me a little bit about the country, show it to me on our own large world map, and then tell me something interesting that she has learned.  Often, we follow up our discussion with Googling anything we want to learn more about, and we’ve spent a little time looking in our own library for more information on places that we found particularly interesting.
  • Pros:  I really enjoyed this being an independent subject.  It was wonderful to hand her the workbooks and know that the content was solid and that she would be able to understand and answer any questions that followed.  The maps are detailed and easy to read, and my daughter had no trouble finding the locations or names of the required fields.  More than anything, I appreciated the straightforward approach.  This is NOT a hands-on curriculum, which is a plus in my book.  I have many hands-on things, and I needed Geography to be something that my daughter could reasonably do herself without sacrificing content.  This curriculum is exactly what I’d hoped for.
  • Cons:  If you want something with crafts, that delves more into culture and color, this is NOT the curriculum for you.  Memoria Press has put together a program that gives the student the basic facts of each country and a handful of interesting facts for a brief picture of their history and culture.  I believe that it is an excellent jumping-off point for any child to do more of their own research, but if you want depth and interaction, you will probably do best to look elsewhere.

Conclusion:  We will most certainly continue to use Geography I, and I plan to purchase the following levels as the kids get older.  I appreciate the “no frills” approach to the subject, and I think that it lends itself to familiarity of the subject without encroaching on the time needed to do the rest of our schoolwork.

Be sure to read what our other reviewers had to say about this and other Memoria Press products.

Disclaimer:  I received a free copy of this product in exchange for my honest review on the Sandbox to Socrates blog. Opinions expressed in this review are the opinions of myself or my family and do not necessarily reflect those of the Sandbox to Socrates blog. I received no compensation for this review, nor was I required to write a positive review. This disclosure is in accordance with the FTC Regulations.

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by Kristen  – Kristen is a homeschooling mom of four, living deep in the heart of Texas. She loves history, running, and camping, and drinks more coffee than is prudent. Kristen blogs about her daily adventures trying to classically homeschool kids who would always rather be up a tree than writing anything, ever, at www.unsinkablekristen.blogspot.com

Memoria Press Review by Lynne: Geography I

Our family had the opportunity to review the Geography I curriculum from Memoria Press. Memoria Press includes this program in their fourth grade curriculum.  You can purchase the Geography portion for $48.  I used it with my fourth- and fifth-grade sons.

Geography I covers the Middle East, North Africa, and Europe.  It also includes a review booklet for the United States.  We’ve always done geography in conjunction with history, and not as a separate subject, so I was interested to see how this would work for us.

The Student Text begins each section with a brief overview and map of the region.  The regional information is followed by a two-page spread for each country in the region.  You can see a sample of this layout on MP’s website.  The first page is broken down into three sections:  History’s Headlines, where we get highlights of the country’s past; Tour of Today, where we learn of events from the not-so-distant past; and Fast Facts, where we get the stats about the country and learn about its flag.  There are also black-and-white pictures to accompany each country. The second page is a basic map showing the country in relation to its surrounding countries and bodies of water. In the back of the book, there are several colorful pages of flags.  My kids were very interested in the flags, so I actually found them some flag stickers that they could put on each page.

The Geography I Student Workbook has a page for each country for the students to label a few of the major geographical locations and to record some basic information about the country.  You can see a sample page here.  The answers are provided in the Teacher Guide.

The United States Student Workbook breaks the country into eight regions.  For each region, there are worksheet pages to identify the name of the state and its capital.  We had never done a formal study of United States geography, so I was surprised when my kids just whipped through the United States booklet.  They informed me that they learned the states and capitals through various educational video games.

I normally choose secular materials for my kids, but I have used other MP items and have not found them to be overbearing in their religious viewpoint.  If you want no mention of God or Christianity at all in your curriculum. though, this is not the program for you.

As a preliminary foray into Geography, I don’t think you’ll find a more simple and easy product to use.  It provides a good overview of the various regions and what countries make up those regions.  The text is brief and simple, but you could easily do more independent research on a country that strikes your fancy.  The maps are clear and simple and provide a good sense of the main points of interest.  My kids enjoyed using these books, so we have decided to continue on with Geography II next year.  Once again, though, I will cut off the binding and have the workbooks spiral bound.  My kids do not like trying to hold a book flat while writing in it.  I just photocopied the workbook pages so they could lay them flat until I was able to spiral bind the book.

Be sure to read what our other reviewers had to say about this and other Memoria Press products.

Disclaimer:  I received a free copy of this product in exchange for my honest review on the Sandbox to Socrates blog. Opinions expressed in this review are the opinions of myself or my family and do not necessarily reflect those of the Sandbox to Socrates blog. I received no compensation for this review, nor was I required to write a positive review. This disclosure is in accordance with the FTC Regulations.

  lynneby Lynne –Lynne has enjoyed homeschooling her two sons for the past three years, after their brief stint in the local public school.  Her older son is a humorous fellow with high functioning autism who thrives in a home education environment.  Her younger son is a sensitive soul with a great deal of patience. The boys, Mom, and Dad, along with the two guinea pigs, live in Northeast Ohio.  Lynne holds a Master’s Degree in French Language and Literature.  She is also a Harry Potter fanatic, enjoys line dancing and Zumba, spends hours scrapbooking, and loves organic vegetables.  You can visit her soon-to-be revitalized blog at www.daysofwonderhomeschool.blogspot.com.

Memoria Press Review by Nakia: Geography I

I reviewed Geography 1 from Memoria Press. This three-book set (student text, student workbook, and teacher guide) covers The Middle East, North Africa, and Europe. The entire course covers 53 countries. I used this product with a 5th grader and an 8th grader.

Photo by Flavio Takemoto

After an introduction, the student text begins with a brief survey of each region and then focuses on individual countries. For each country, there is a one-page summary and a fully-labeled black and white map on the facing page. The summary for each country includes a historical reference section called “History’s Headlines” and some “Fast Facts” (such as capital city, population, and flag description). The facts listed are interesting, if a bit brief. I would have preferred more historical background information to provide context, as one of the goals listed on the Memoria Press website for this course is “deepening his understanding of both the past and the present.” Each summary page also includes one or two black-and-white photographs. In the back of the student text are full-color illustrations of each country’s flag.

The student workbook features a black-and-white map for the student to label along with a fill-in-the-blank worksheet for the student to complete.  Answers to the worksheet can be found in the student text. A word bank for use with the map is provided for the student. There is a review page after each region where students are asked to fill in the country and capital and label a blank map. Students are encouraged to “pay close attention to correct spelling” which is always a great reminder and much appreciated by homeschool parents!

After a brief introduction with recommendations for scheduling the course, the teacher guide includes all answers to the student workbook along with completed maps. This is definitely welcome and helpful to the parent/teacher.

This geography course is a good tool for learning and memorizing countries and capitals and their locations. I appreciate the opportunity to review this product.

Be sure to read what our other reviewers had to say about this and other Memoria Press products.

Disclaimer:  I received a free copy of this product in exchange for my honest review on the Sandbox to Socrates blog. Opinions expressed in this review are the opinions of myself or my family and do not necessarily reflect those of the Sandbox to Socrates blog. I received no compensation for this review, nor was I required to write a positive review. This disclosure is in accordance with the FTC Regulations.

nakia

Nakia–Nakia is a Southern girl, born and raised in North Carolina. She is married to her high school sweetheart and is in her 9th year of homeschooling her three wonderful daughters. She works part time as a nurse and loves photography, thrift shopping, baking, and autumn in the mountains.

Memoria Press Review by Emma: United States Geography

We are currently studying American History, and so I wanted to introduce a study of the states to our lesson time. Memoria PressThe United States curriculum has been a great supplement to our studies.

Once a week, my eight-year-old son would sit down to do a lesson in the workbook. After completing the lesson, he’d bring it to me, and I would check the answers in the Teacher’s Manual. This curriculum is basic and to-the-point, but effective.

▪Pros:  The curriculum can be done independently, which has been hugely helpful lately. It also has a bit of hands-on in the form of coloring, which my son enjoys.

▪Cons:  Other than the fact that I wish there was more color and visual appeal, there aren’t many negatives. This curriculum is strictly meant to teach about the states, capitals, etc., and it accomplishes that very well.

Conclusion:  I plan to continue using The United States and will follow it up with States and Capitals once finished.

Be sure to read what our other reviewers had to say about this and other Memoria Press products.

Disclaimer:  I received a free copy of this product in exchange for my honest review on the Sandbox to Socrates blog. Opinions expressed in this review are the opinions of myself or my family and do not necessarily reflect those of the Sandbox to Socrates blog. I received no compensation for this review, nor was I required to write a positive review. This disclosure is in accordance with the FTC Regulations.

emma

Emma–Emma has been married for seven years, and is mom of two, plus one once-crazy dog. She’s been homeschooling for three years now in NC. In addition to being a wife, mom and educator, she is also a Graphic Designer.

Memoria Press Review by Darla: Geography I

I received in my package a teacher’s manual for Geography I, a student text, a student workbook, tests and quizzes, and a review of 50 states. The goal of this program is to familiarize your young learner with countries and their capitals. It is not meant to be an in-depth study of world cultures, so if you’re looking for something to take the place of history for a year and give you some deep learning to spend several hours a week on, this is not it. It would make a good jumping-off point in my opinion, however, and more could easily be added per your student’s interest level.

This is a Christian publisher, so secular users will want to know that when covering areas of the Holy Land Biblical accounts are treated as fact. This is a given with any Christian publisher as far as I know. This led us to some discussion on what archaeologists are able to discover vs. various historical accounts and how they don’t always agree.

Onward to how the program works! Each country has a two-page spread in the text, and a correlating one-page exercise in the student workbook. The exercises are mostly map work. On a good day, geography can be done in about fifteen minutes if you cover one country at a time. The student is asked to read the text, label the map, copy the name of the country and its capital three times and add in some facts that he found interesting. Covering two or three countries a week will be a good pace for most families.

We had never really done the 50 states, so the review package sort of wasn’t review for my student. Somehow, he knows the states better than I expected and is moving along nicely on learning the capitals. He is ten years old, and we do keep maps up which have always interested him. It’s been enough.

The only improvement I would not mind seeing would be a separate pamphlet (or download) for quizzes and tests. They are included in the teacher manual which makes them a bit difficult to use.

We are looking forward to Geography II next!

Be sure to read what our other reviewers had to say about this and other Memoria Press products.

Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this product in exchange for my honest review on the Sandbox to Socrates blog. Opinions expressed in this review are the opinions of myself or my family and do not necessarily reflect those of the Sandbox to Socrates blog. I received no compensation for this review, nor was I required to write a positive review. This disclosure is in accordance with the FTC Regulations.

by Darla