The Early Years at Our House, by Cheryl

 

Children’s brains are amazing things. You may not always see it, but they are absorbing everything around them. An environment rich in educational activities will take a preschooler or kindergartener far.

Everyone dotes on their firstborn. When you have one, you have so much time! For two and a half years it was just Aidan, Mom, and Dad. Then for a year we had a mostly non-mobile baby who just wanted to be held. We worked with Aidan on his letters, numbers, colors, and shapes daily. He loved it! He wanted to do worksheets, so I bought workbooks from Target. He wanted to read, so we took Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons and played around with it. He started to read and was old enough for kindergarten, so I picked up What Your Kindergartner Needs to Know and we went through the science, history, geography, and literature,  adding to it with books from the library. We did math with a book from Walmart. When the time came for first grade, he tested into second grade math and grammar and sixth grade for reading. We only worked 30 minutes a day, three or four days a week.

Lilly started asking to do school at age three. She wanted to do what “bubby” was doing. I printed out Brightly Beaming’s Letter of the Week curriculum and we played around with it. When she turned four, I bought Rod and Staff’s ABC books. We worked in the books when she was interested. Finally, this year we started more structured work. We struggled with reading for a while, but as of our last official day of kindergarten she can do the following:

1. Read on a K/1st grade level — based on where we are in the Bob Books and McGuffey’s Eclectic Primer, and her ability to read Hop on Pop. She can write all of her letters and spell her name. She writes legible 1-2 word captions for her artwork.

2. She can do everything on the kindergarten list from Math Mammoth. She knows her math facts within five and can find the answers up to ten with manipulatives.

3. She has a fantastic imagination. She becomes different creatures and tells me stories. She creates amazing artwork.

4. She knows a lot about animals and plants through books we have read and from helping in our garden.

She is on “level” with very little structured work.

When I say level, I am not comparing her to what the public schools require of kindergartners; I am looking at research from curriculum developers and what is suggested for 5-6 year olds by the Core Knowledge Group, Charlotte Mason, and Susan Wise Bauer and Jessie Wise in The Well-Trained Mind.

I am not looking for college and career readiness in kindergarten; I am looking for steady growth. I require little writing from my preschool and kindergartners. I have only started requiring writing outside of penmanship practice for my oldest this year in third grade.

I did minimal structured work with either child. They learned at their own pace, and we found their strengths and weaknesses. I was also able to find how they learn. I had time to adjust my teaching methods and curriculum choices to each child’s needs instead of feeling stuck by the expensive curriculum I purchased and felt the need to complete.

Some of my favorite preschool and kindergarten resources include:

Brightly Beaming – We enjoyed the Letter of the Week Curriculum plans. This free resource has coloring pages, activities, and lesson plans for preschool and kindergarten.

Rod and Staff ABC series – The books help develop fine motor skills as well as color, shape, number, and letter recognition. The Bible Story Book gives a good introduction to the Bible if you want that for your family. The books can be purchased individually if you do not want the Bible lessons.

What Your Kindergartner Needs to Know – This series is a great way to be sure your child is “on level.” I love the literature selections for kindergarten. It also provides a good framework for history, science, and geography studies. I used our library to broaden our study on each topic.

Explode the Code – This series of books helps students develop strong phonics skills.

The Bob Books – The books are leveled readers, the repetition helps emerging and early readers cement phonics in their minds and  memorize sight words.

McGuffey’s Eclectic Readers – The series builds in difficulty in a scientific manner. The lessons include spelling and reading instruction.

School Zone’s Big Math 1-2 – If you can find it with the DVD, the games help kids learn basic math up through 3 and 4 digit addition/subtraction with regrouping. The book has plenty of pages of practice problems for early addition and subtraction practice. If you make it through the whole book, it introduces multiplication.

Target’s $1 Aisle – I check this regularly in the months of July-September. You can find clock manipulatives, flash cards, workbooks of all levels, and other great educational items. All for $1 each!

Other things to keep in the house: Play dough, crayons, coloring books, blank paper, construction paper, paints, building blocks and Legos, math manipulatives (Cuisinaire rods, Math-U-See blocks, Mortensen Math blocks, beans, marbles, anything countable), lots of books, and your imagination.

Our littlest students will learn. Provide the environment and they will thrive! Don’t push, work at your child’s pace and not only will they learn what they need to learn, they will grow to love learning!

 

Chcheryleryl–Cheryl is a singing, dancing, baking, homeschooling mom of three. She has danced her whole life and taught ballet and theatre for most of her adult life. Her favorite pastime has always been cooking and baking, and as a Pampered Chef Independent Consultant she gets to share that love with others. Home educating her three children has been and continues to be one of her greatest learning experiences! It is an adventure she is ready to continue.

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World Biomes #5: Marine — The Ocean, by Cheryl

 

Previously: The Taiga

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Two years ago we took the kids to the beach for the first time. They loved searching for shells and playing in the waves. I timed this biome study for the two weeks before we left for our second trip to the ocean. We studied the animals, plants, and more before we left – and then we experienced them in real life!

Our library held a plethora of books on this subject! We also found a few interesting books on our trip.

Down, Down, Down in the Ocean by Sandra Markle describes the four levels of the ocean and what is found in each.

About Habitats: Oceans by Cathryn Sill was a fun, quick read that introduced us to many ocean creatures!

Who’s at the Seashore? by John Himmelman has beautiful illustrations with a look at animals living in and near the ocean.

Looking Closely Along the Shore by Frank Serafini provides close-up pictures and a guessing game. I love that our library has several books in this series. It has been a great way to keep my six-year-old interested in our study!

Coral Reefs by Jason Chin has beautiful illustrations and great information on food chains and webs in the coral reefs.

Even an Octopus Needs a Home by Irene Kelley has information on animals from many biomes and where they live. It covered a couple of ocean animals but also provided us with a review of animals we have already studied.

Life Cycles: Ocean by Sean Callery has a lot of information. We did not read this together, but my eight-year-old used it as a reference for a report he put together on sea turtles.

Ocean Seasons by Ron Hirschi covers a year in the ocean and how the animals migrate and live in the different seasons.

Seashore Life by Herbert S. Zim and Lester Ingle is a book we picked up on vacation. We used it to identify the many shells we collected at the beach!

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We also included some videos in our study:

The Wild Kratts Ocean episode is a favorite in our house. We also watched Finding Nemo as part of our study. I think my kids absorbed and recalled more from these cartoons than from any book we read!

DK Eyewitness DVD: Seashore gave us a good introduction into ocean life and allowed me to get some other work done while we studied!

Who Lives in the Sea by Annie Crawley was another DVD I picked up as an intro to our study.

Marine Wildlife

The world’s oceans support an immense variety of wildlife of all shapes and sizes. Some of the world’s most intriguing creatures live in the oceans. We learned about arrow worms, herring, salmon, sharks, seals, shrimp, hatchet fish, salp (which looks like one big creature but is really a colony that is connected!), sperm whales, giant squid, sea cucumbers, gulper eels, angler fish, viper fish, clams, crabs, tube worms, barnacles, sea stars, anemones, Portuguese Man of War, blackwing flying fish, octopus, lobsters, and penguins.

On vacation we went on a dolphin tour! It was amazing to see these animals up close!

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Plants

Algae and seaweed are plants found in the oceans. Much of the ocean is void of plant life due to a lack of light.

Vocabulary

Crustaceans, Sand Dollar, Conch Shells, Microclimate

Fun Fact

The oceans are divided into four zones or levels: the ocean surface, the twilight zone, the midnight zone, and the ocean floor.

 

Cherycheryll–Cheryl is a singing, dancing, baking, homeschooling mom of three. She has danced her whole life and taught ballet and theatre for most of her adult life. Her favorite pastime has always been cooking and baking, and as a Pampered Chef Independent Consultant she gets to share that love with others. Home educating her three children has been and continues to be one of her greatest learning experiences! It is an adventure she is ready to continue.

Testing and Record-Keeping in a Minimally Regulated State, by Cheryl

 

What do you do when nothing (or little) is required of you?

The Oklahoma State Constitution provides protection for the right of parents to homeschool their children. The Attorney General qualified that right by stating “so long as the private instruction is supplied in good faith and equivalent in fact to that afforded by the State.” “Equivalency” has never been established. The compulsory school age is over 5 and under 18, and 180 days of instruction must be completed in a year. The following subjects must be taught: math, writing, reading, citizenship, U.S. Constitution, health, science, P.E., safety, and conservation. Although this is all required, we report to no one. No one looks at our attendance chart or our grade records. (For a full evaluation of the laws affecting homeschools in Oklahoma, visit the OCHEC website* or HSLDA’s page on Oklahoma Regulations.)

*The OCHEC website includes a withdrawal form for children who have been in public school previously.

If your child has never been enrolled in public school, as of the publishing of this article, there is nothing you must do in this state.

With no one to report to,and no required records to maintain, there is great freedom — but should you really do nothing? Should you just forego record keeping all together? In my opinion, no. Why?

1. It is good to keep some sort of record to track your child’s progress. It is also fun to go back and compare their work from previous years to see how they have grown. In addition, laws can change or you could face a move to a more highly-regulated state. It is good to be in the habit of keeping some records.

Lilly at the microscoper

3. If your child is interested in attending college, you will need records of work at the high school level that fulfills the admission requirements for the school. By keeping records throughout the child’s school career, it will be a less daunting task when you reach high school.

Aidan doing Math

I keep three types of records for our school. The first is simply to keep all work completed in a year. We date our work and everything goes in one box at the end of the year. The second is a photographic record of the kids on field trips and working at home. The third is one standardized test at the end of each year. (I have played around with several online and paper planners for maintaining records. For elementary school–for me and the way we run our homeschool–they are not a good fit. When we reach middle school or logic stage work, I plan to add an online planner to our record keeping.)

making a lapbook

Why do I test if it is not required? For my peace of mind. That is the only reason. I start testing when my kids are at a first grade level or above in reading and math. I order my tests through Seton Testing. The tests are inexpensive, and the company has provided quick service every year we have used them. Scores are posted to your online account for a quick turnaround time.

I have used the CAT/E or CAT Survey for 1st and 2nd grade and the CogAT for 3rd and will use it again for 4th/5th grade testing. I like these tests because they only test math, reading, and language abilities, not science or social studies. Since we follow the classical method as laid out in The Well-Trained Mind, we do four-year history and science cycles. What we study does not line up with what is taught in most public and private schools in the lower elementary (or grammar) stage. I just want to see how my kids are doing in the basics of math and language.

I do not test for the “grade” my child is in, or the “grade” they would be in if enrolled in public school. I select the test for the level at which my child works. My son took the first grade CAT/E when in “kindergarten” because he was working on first grade math and reading. This year he has made a huge leap and we will test at a 5th grade level (last year we did 3rd). My daughter is in kindergarten, working at a kindergarten level, so we will not test this year. Next year we will start with a first grade test. You will not gain any information about your child’s growth and development if you test too far below or above their level. (This advice is meant only for states where testing is NOT mandated; if testing is required, follow the regulations for your state.)

One side benefit of testing when it is not required: If anyone were to question the education of my children, I have tests that show they are at or above the level of their peers. Another side benefit is that they have practice taking standardized tests in a low-stress environment. My hope is that they will be very comfortable with testing by the time they start taking college admissions tests.

When nothing is required of you, you must be more self-motivated. You must set the standards you want for yourself and your children.

 

CherylcherylCheryl is a singing, dancing, baking, homeschooling mom of three. She has danced her whole life and taught ballet and theatre for most of her adult life. Her favorite pastime has always been cooking and baking, and as a Pampered Chef Independent Consultant she gets to share that love with others. Home educating her three children has been and continues to be one of her greatest learning experiences! It is an adventure she is ready to continue.

In the Age of High-Stakes Testing, How Do I Know if My Child Measures Up? by Cheryl

One of my biggest fears as a homeschool mom has been that my children will be “behind.” Behind what? Behind where the public school system says they should be? This fear plagues the minds of many new homeschool parents. The school systems have numerous fancy tests to check a child’s progress, but is this really the best way to evaluate a child? In the past few months the debate surrounding the reading test for Oklahoma third graders has been anything but pretty. One test was to determine if a third grader would be promoted to fourth grade.

With the adoption of Common Core in many states, the high-stakes testing is getting worse. If this is how the schools are monitoring a child’s progress, is this what homeschoolers should do, too? I do test my kids once a year when they are at or above a first grade math and reading level. I use a product that only tests language and math skills. Before we test, I have an idea of how my child will perform because I have been evaluating them all year.

The nature of homeschooling allows for constant monitoring of your child’s progress. But how do you really know? I have listed a few of the methods I use to evaluate my children in various subjects.

Reading: My children read aloud to me daily. I ask questions about what they have read. For my oldest, some days we read out of a McGuffey reader, and most days he reads his grammar lesson to me and then we discuss. If you want to check for decoding abilities, reading aloud is the best method to test. For comprehension, ask your child to narrate what they just read. (With narration, after they read they tell you what they read.) Another less intrusive testing method is emotional response. If your child is reading alone and begins to laugh at a funny book or cry at a sad one, you’ll know they are gaining comprehension. I have watched my eight-year-old laugh at many books he reads. It gives me great joy to see him react to a book!

Math: After working together on a topic, I send my oldest to work alone. After I check his work, we rework any problems he missed. We retouch on topics as we do the built-in reviews. If one type of problem is missed more than I think it should be, we go back to that topic. If a child struggles on advanced topics, it is a good bet that some more basic skill is lacking. Review and then try again.

Spelling and Grammar: These subjects are some of the easiest to test. Look at what your child writes during non-school hours. You will see what is carrying over. I also do dictation three days a week to practice spelling and punctuation. I recite sentences or paragraphs using words we have studied in spelling and punctuation we have covered in grammar. We discuss mistakes and then try another sentence or paragraph.

Science and History: Talk to your kids and listen to what they want to tell you. My son will talk my ear off about a science topic that interests him. I know what he is retaining when he talks to me or creates books about a topic. After a chapter on magnets in Physics, it has become his favorite topic. I have let him run with it.

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My eight-year-old made this book for fun. I can see that we need to work on capitalization and punctuation, but his knowledge of magnets is far beyond what I expected.

I combine formal evaluation with much less formal evaluation methods. As I work with my kids daily, I learn their strengths and weaknesses. The one-on-one focus that homeschooling gives parents make the evaluation of skills simple.

Test if you want, but don’t let the pressure of the tests used in schools add stress to your homeschool. The tests should be treated as one tool of many in our education process. You will know your kids are learning. I struggled with this idea as it is a hard shift to make in one’s thinking about education, but you will see it and you will be amazed by what their minds can do!

 

Cherylcheryl–Cheryl is a singing, dancing, baking, homeschooling mom of three. She has danced her whole life and taught ballet and theatre for most of her adult life. Her favorite pastime has always been cooking and baking, and as a Pampered Chef Independent Consultant she gets to share that love with others. Home educating her three children has been and continues to be one of her greatest learning experiences! It is an adventure she is ready to continue.

Curricula Fairs and Conventions: How NOT to be Overwhelmed! by Cheryl

 

You have decided to homeschool. You have taken the necessary steps to withdraw your child(ren) from school or register with your district/state. Now you need to pick the perfect curriculum. Where do you start? What about the convention and curricula fair that is happening in the spring? You can go and browse everything that’s out there and make a decision! There is nothing better than getting a hands-on look at everything, right?

WRONG!

A convention or curricula fair should be your last stop on the journey to find the right curriculum. The best way to guarantee that you will be overwhelmed  is to go in without any prior research. So how do you prepare? A few simple steps will help you enjoy the convention and find what you need.

1. Know what method of homeschooling fits your family: Classical, school-at-home, Charlotte Mason, eclectic, or unschooling. Most libraries have a shelf of books on homeschooling. Select one with an overview of different methods to start your research. Once you pick a method, select a book that is specific to that method. I use a few books as support on my journey through classical homeschooling: The Well-Trained Mind by Susan Wise-Bauer and Jessie Wise, The Core by Leigh Bortins, and Charlotte Mason’s original homeschool series. The first two books have curriculum suggestions for most subjects. These are my guide as I start to narrow my search.

2. Know your teaching style. Do you need a script to teach, or just a textbook? Some products (Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons, The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading, some Abeka products) tell you word for word what to say to the student. Others provide a teacher’s manual with teaching helps (Singapore Math, Rod and Staff, Real Science 4 Kids, and many others). Some are self-teaching (upper levels of Saxon math, Teaching Textbooks). What do you need and what do your kids need?

3. What subjects do you want or need to cover? This will be partially determined by your state and partially by your child’s age and interests. Most families will cover math, science, history, literature, grammar, and spelling. Do you want to add a foreign language? Which one? Do you want to add geography, health, social studies, or writing? Do you need reading and phonics? Make a list of what you want to cover.

4. Is there a company that specializes in curricula for your style? Classical Academic Press, Memoria Press, Peace Hill Press, and Classical Conversations all cater to classical homeschoolers. Do you have to be classical to use their products? No, but knowing that classical is the method they specialize in will help you as you shop. The scope and sequence of the products is geared toward the classical student.

5. Do you want secular, protestant Christian, Catholic, or Jewish programs? Or does it not matter?

Once you have considered these five things, you should have a manageable list of curricula to search out at convention. By this time, you are no longer researching; you are at the decision-making point. You will know which tables to visit and which tables to skip.

Will there be distractions in the vendor hall? Yes. Will you find something new and wonderful that you’ve never heard of but is perfect and you must have it? Yes. But you will be focused and you will be able to weigh your options better because you are informed.

Before purchasing, there are two more steps to completing the process and be satisfied with your decisions.

6. Set a budget. You know what you can spend. Set a limit and stick to it! You don’t need to buy EVERYTHING. You can find literature selections and some history curricula at your library. Be sure you have checked what is available.

7. If your convention lasts two days, window shop and attend seminars on the first day. DO NOT BUY ANYTHING YET! Take a notebook. Look at everything on your list. Make a price list. (Many times you will save money by purchasing at convention: No shipping charges and sometimes a discount for buying on-site. Note the savings in your list.) Go home, review the list, make decisions, sleep –  and then go back to purchase the second day. This alone is the best piece of advice I have ever been given.

If your convention is only one day, follow the same steps, but do it before and after lunch.

Our local convention is huge, with thousands of people and more tables than I have time to visit. By going in well-researched with a shopping list, I know my shopping experience will be less stressful. This allows me to pick the speakers and workshops I want to attend and shop in between. I don’t feel the need to spend all day in the vendor hall.

One final and important hint: Take a rolling cart for your purchases! Those books get heavy fast!!

Conventions can be a great help and support to new and veteran homeschoolers, but we must all go in prepared!

 

Cheryl–Cheryl is a singing, dancing, baking, homeschooling mom of three. She has danced her whole life and taught ballet and cheryltheatre for most of her adult life. Her favorite pastime has always been cooking and baking, and as a Pampered Chef Independent Consultant she gets to share that love with others. Home educating her three children has been and continues to be one of her greatest learning experiences! It is an adventure she is ready to continue.

World Biomes: The Taiga, by Cheryl

 

Previously:  The Rain Forest

The taiga or boreal forest has been my favorite biome so far. The variety of animal life within these forests is amazing! Much of the variety is due to migratory patterns of birds and other wildlife. We spent some time studying migration as we read about the wildlife in these forests.

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My son, four years ago, on the timber wolf statue in my parents’ back yard.

Books on this biome were hard to come by in our library system. We found a couple of general information books and then selected some specific animals from the biome to study more in depth. Some of our favorite books were:

Life in the Boreal Forest by Brenda Z. Guiberson was a quick read and a great introduction to the biome. We loved the illustrations and the many interesting animals it introduced.

Ecosystems: Boreal Forests by Patricia Miller-Schroeder was more in depth than our first book. We read and studied portions of the book. For older children, this would be a great place to start.

Forest by Frank Howard offered a couple of pages on each type of forest. We reviewed our rain forest knowledge and got a hint of what is to come with our other studies.

Look Inside a Beaver’s Lodge by Meagan Cooley Peterson gave us a fun look at the life of a beaver.

A Moose’s World by Caroline Arnold went through the first year of life for a moose.

Angry Birds: Playground: Animals: An Around the World Habitat Adventure by Jill Esbaum covered more than just our taiga animals. My son found it and has made it his extra reading. We plan to hang on to it through the rest of our study.The Angry Birds characters introduce you to animals in a variety of habitats.

Why Do Birds Fly South? another Weekly Reader ‘Just Ask’ book we had at home provided a good explanation of migration. We found that many birds of the taiga are migratory, so we added a short study of migration to this area of our study.

Animals of the Taiga

Non-Migratory – Moose, Beaver, Snowshoe Hare, Brown Bear, Lynx, Wolves, Voles, Great Horned Owl, Red Fox, Ermine, Timber Wolves, Grizzly Bears, and the Stone Centipede.

Migratory – Tennessee Warblers, Whooping Crane, Pelicans, Cross-bills

(It just happened that as we finished up our study of the taiga, my son’s IEW assignment was to write a report on the whooping crane. This made an excellent extension to our study. I love it when things work out that way! This can easily be added to every biome, if your student knows how to write a research report. They don’t have to be long; my son’s was only three paragraphs.)

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Plants

Spruce, Fir, Pitcher Plant, Birch, Larch, Poplar, Lichen, Mushrooms, and Moss

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Vocabulary

Migration, Chlorophyll, Isotherm, Permafrost, Deciduous, Evergreen, Coniferous, and Hibernation

Fun Fact

Boreal means northern, after the Greek god of the North – Boreas. The boreal forest covers approximately 50 million acres.

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Lapbook

Our lapbook entries covered migratory and non-migratory birds, deciduous and evergreen trees, animals, photosynthesis, and migration.

Coverpage, Animals, Birds, Trees, Map, Review Sheet, Migration, Photosynthesis

 

Next time: The Ocean!

 

CherylcherylCheryl is a singing, dancing, baking, homeschooling mom of three. She has danced her whole life and taught ballet and theatre for most of her adult life. Her favorite pastime has always been cooking and baking, and as a Pampered Chef Independent Consultant she gets to share that love with others. Home educating her three children has been and continues to be one of her greatest learning experiences! It is an adventure she is ready to continue.

Parents Are Teachers: You Can Teach Your Child to Read, by Cheryl

 

Before we became official homeschoolers, I knew my son needed to learn to read. He was only four, but he wanted to read and was picking up some things on his own. I wanted him to have a good foundation. I wanted him to know phonics better than I did, but I was terrified I would mess him up for life by teaching him wrong!

All my life it had been made clear to me that you needed a degree to teach. I could not teach reading. I knew people who had done it, but I did not think I could. No way! I can teach kids to dance and sing, but read? I needed a professional.

One day a good friend brought me a book: Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons. She told me I could do it. I also checked out the first set of Bob Books from the library (at her suggestion), and we gave it a try. Within a month, my son had read through half the Easy Lessons book and two sets of Bob Books! I did it! This reading thing was easy.

A little over two years later, my daughter (at age four) wanted to learn to read. My son read at four, so I tried. We went back to 100 Easy Lessons, but it was a disaster–there were tears every day. She just wasn’t ready; the desire was there, but not the maturity. We stopped.

Six months later we tried again, and again there were tears. We had studied all the letters, and moved on with more advanced phonics and some sight words, so I thought she was ready for sure. Again, we stopped. After another six months we tried again, and again we had tears.

What was I doing wrong? She was almost six and yet was not anywhere near reading. (I learned that it is not abnormal for a child to learn to read as late as 8.)

I was ready to give up until I read Charlotte Mason’s method of teaching reading.The first book in her Original Homeschooling Series lays out the plan in a clear and easy-to-follow way. (Read the full plan here or start at page 199 if you have access to a print copy of her series.) I started to use that method, and we made progress. We continued with phonics workbooks to support her reading. Eventually the Charlotte Mason method became too cumbersome. I like open-and-go-type programs, and this method required me to find books and make cards of all the words on a page. It took more prep time than I had.

I went to my bookshelves and stood staring at everything I had. I decided to go back to the simple, tried and true method: McGuffey’s Eclectic Readers. The pictorial primer lays out a lesson similar to the Charlotte Mason method, but I did not need to prep for it. Each lesson builds on the next in slow steps. I am pairing that with the Explode the Code series for phonics, and we have made significant progress in a couple of months.

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The most important lesson I learned through this season in our homeschool life is that my kids are different and I must adjust our lessons accordingly. What works for one child may not work for another. Finding a method that works for teacher and student may take some trial and error, but it is important to find the right match for everyone.

Don’t let one “failure” stop you. There is a method that will work for each child; sometimes it is the curriculum that makes the difference, but sometimes the child needs more time.

Some Practical Help

One of our problems was reading-readiness. How do you know if your child is ready to read? A few things to look for:

1. Interest. Does the child want to read?
2. Ability to rhyme. This ability is linked to the ability to decode word families. My daughter only started rhyming in the last six months.
3. Oral blending. Break a word down into sounds orally (/k/-/a/-/t/) and have the child tell you the word. If she can’t do it listening to you, she will struggle doing it completely on her own.
4. Left to right tracking. Another issue we had to overcome. The human brain is not born tracking from left to right; it takes everything in at once. Practice this skill by having your child match a pattern or series you lay out in blocks or letters, starting on the left.

There are others, but with my daughter, these were the big four we faced. She had #1 down (interest), so we kept working on the other three skills until she was comfortable with them; then lessons became easier.

If the task at hand has you scared you may ruin your child for life (you won’t!), many programs exist to help you teach reading. These are all products we have used with some success in our house.

Teach You’re Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons

The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading

The Bob Books

Junior Phonics

The Writing Road to Reading

Explode the Code

McGuffey’s Eclectic Readers

All About Reading, Abeka, and Rod and Staff’s reading program have been recommended many times as well.

You can do it! You can teach your child!

 

Cherylcheryl–Cheryl is a singing, dancing, baking, homeschooling mom of three. She has danced her whole life and taught ballet and theatre for most of her adult life. Her favorite pastime has always been cooking and baking, and as a Pampered Chef Independent Consultant she gets to share that love with others. Home educating her three children has been and continues to be one of her greatest learning experiences! It is an adventure she is ready to continue.