Keeping Records Through Middle School, by Angela Berkeley

 

Homeschooling elementary students is a somewhat daunting yet very exciting process.  Having selected a classical education philosophy, you assemble your teaching aids, materials, and curricula. You feel like you’re all ready to start. But then you realize that you also face a somewhat crumpling question: How will you know whether you’re teaching successfully? How will you evaluate your child? How much is ‘enough’? How will you know?

The responsibility is yours. You can’t fall back on anyone else. You’re the teacher. You’re the evaluator. You’re the assessor of whether reasonable progress is being made. And frankly, after the hard work of figuring out your teaching philosophy, studying up on curricula or other materials, finding out how to register with the state properly, it almost seems like too much. It’s a bit daunting. It almost makes you want to fall back on ‘school in a box’—a program that has textbooks for all subjects needed for one entire grade. Then you will know that there are no gaps, right? Then you will know that your child is on grade level.

But wait.

Classical education is different. Our standards for assessing grade level are to be age appropriate and focused on each child’s individual capabilities. Marching your child through standard classroom material in the 180 days of a standard school year schedule really gives up a great deal of the available benefits of homeschooling. Being inflexible does nothing to customize your child’s learning to her unique abilities. It does not permit letting her spring ahead in composition compared with spelling, for instance. It does not allow the significant advantage of being able to take family vacations and field trips away from the school crowds during the school year. It doesn’t let you catch up or leap ahead in math over the summer or enjoy full days out in wild parks during the week or take three weeks off at Christmas time and thoroughly enjoy the holidays. It leaves no room for a four-week focus on writing a novel, complete with character development, dialogue, and imaginative development; or to coordinate your science studies with your Lego robotics projects. In short, it gives up too much for too little—for that bit of security based on norming your child to be like every other child of the same age.

By nature, classical homeschooling takes a far different approach to learning than typical public school curricula. It focuses on learning about the whole world, from the very start. It teaches reading, writing, and other language arts from a very different perspective than public schools—emphasizing massive amounts of personal and read-aloud literature, history, and science. It avoids busy work so completely that it empowers children to recognize and resist it forever. It uses copywork and grammar as well as composition to teach writing skills. Science is taught in depth; experiments and field trips are more important than book work at the early stages. Summarization, outlining, conversation, and thesis formation are taught gradually across all subject areas and lead naturally to being able to formulate and convey effective argumentation. (This is a mixed blessing in the high school years, but I digress…)

Naturally this means that children being taught in a classical manner are not necessarily going to be learning the same strategies and ways of organizing information that public school children do. Or they will learn strategies at different ages than public schoolers, due to a combination of the different sequencing of learning in a classical education and the opportunities for customized progress that homeschooling offers.

Really, though, there is no need for concern about these issues when you’re first getting started, if you take a few basic steps to eliminate these questions. First, make a commitment to homeschool long enough for your child’s learning to converge with public school learning. Generally by around 3rd or 4th grade, the various approaches result in consistently similar results from a testing standpoint. Of course, in addition to the typically tested skills, the classically-homeschooled child has had considerably more experience in science experimentation, more exposure to world history, and a lot more opportunities to investigate a broad range of their own interests.

Secondly, commit to teaching to the point of mastery, and don’t worry about assigning letter or numerical grades through at least 6th grade. Grades are used to assess progress and compare children with each other, by teachers who are teaching an entire classroom full of children. You don’t need to compare your child with others, and you know whether she is learning the material or not, so assigning grades is largely a useless exercise unless and until you need them for an application to a brick and mortar school. If your child is going to homeschool through high school, start assigning grades in 8th grade. If she is going to homeschool through middle school only and needs a transcript to apply for a private high school, find the high school application materials (usually available on their websites) and start assigning grades in the first year that is required on the applications. Many homeschoolers who place their children into public high schools find that they simply need to discuss math and/or honors placement with the high school counseling staff and don’t need to assign middle school grades at all.

Thirdly, establish a routine, and establish minimum weekly progress as an ongoing benchmark. While some use a minute by minute schedule, a routine is effective (and less onerous) for many. What kind of routine? I suggest distinguishing skills from content, and teaching skills every morning and content in the afternoons as much as possible. Skills are things like reading, writing, grammar, and arithmetic. Content areas include history and science. Our ‘typical day’ included a religion lesson first thing, followed by either a lesson in reading skills acquisition or arithmetic, whichever was currently more difficult, followed by the other, and then followed by other aspects of language arts—copywork, editing practice, reading aloud, discussing, and summarizing reading, spelling, etc. Science, history, literature, art, music, foreign language, etc. were taught in the afternoons, and not all of them were taught every day. A reasonable schedule for a week might include 5 math lessons, 4 grammar lessons, 4 copywork episodes, 4 literature lessons, 3 spelling episodes, a foreign language lesson and 2 practices, 2 history lessons, a music lesson, and 2 science lessons. So you would call a week ‘done’ when those were finished, and exceed those quantities most weeks, but also have the flexibility to settle for that amount and know that good progress is being made. Field trips counted into the mix—a day-long trip to a science museum might be the equivalent of 4-5 science lessons. Watching and discussing a play would be perhaps 3-4 literature lessons.

Lastly, track your progress loosely for your own benefit and to make sure that you are not letting anything fall through the cracks. I homeschooled my daughter through 8th grade and used two main tools to track her progress: a master calendar and a monthly template.

The master calendar can be kept in any standard software format. I used Lotus notes, but others such as Outlook would work just fine. The calendar is for exceptions and scheduled lessons outside of the home. Weekly choral and art lessons would go onto the calendar, because despite their being routine, everyone needed to be reminded of the times and dates for lessons that occurred outside of the house. More uncommon exceptions like field trips to the zoo, plays, science museum visits, and play dates were also documented. This meant these activities did not need to be remembered in advance and that later, when documentation was being made, it was easy to create a list of ‘special’ activities.

The monthly template is a Word document that has major subject areas as headings and is cut and pasted into a new Word document each month. Subject areas might be religion, science, math, social studies, writing, reading, other language arts, music, art, PE, and Misc. Each month I would look at a printout of the prior month’s report to remind myself of the status at the beginning of the month. For instance, in March we may have completed the grammar text through lesson 35 and continued through lesson 57 in April. So to write the April report, under ‘other language arts’ I would write, “Grammar lessons 36 through 57.” Hence a short but reasonably detailed overview of progress would easily be generated.

What is useful about this? For one thing, it enables the teaching parent to clearly see that progress is, in fact, being made—something that is easy to miss in the moment. It also gives her a chance to take stock and see whether progress is too skewed—too much writing at the cost of science, for instance, or vice versa. Is there something that should be emphasized more next month? Has progress been so great that it’s time to purchase the next materials? Is there something that could use a little more emphasis? This process also puts a summary of that month’s accomplishments right at the tip of her tongue, for interested relatives or others. And lastly, assembling all of the monthly reports for a year or two is a great starting point if you need to formulate a transcript or an overview of progress for applications to brick and mortar schools, or scholarships, or jobs.

In summary, the processes of homeschool scheduling and record keeping can be thorough, complete, and yet not particularly time consuming. It doesn’t have to be difficult to be effective.

Homeschooling in New York, by Angela

 

 

Homeschooling in New York State has a formidable reputation. The homeschool regulations here are among the toughest in the US, and many new homeschoolers or those new to New York are nervous about them. I’m one of those new homeschoolers — my oldest child turned 6 in May — and yes, I’m a bit nervous (or perhaps terrified)! Many of my friends have done this before, so I have lots of support from moms (and dads) who claim the regulations are very manageable.

Here’s the basic rundown of what is required to start homeschooling in NY state. The actual legal wording and a great FAQ are located here.

  • Parents must submit homeschool paperwork for the year if the child will be older than six years old by December of the school year. These are the children who are considered first graders in the school system.
  • By July 1, parents must send an “intent to homeschool” letter to the superintendent of their local school. (Or within 14 days after you pull your child out of school, if you start mid-year.)
  • Within ten business days, the school district must send you a copy of the regulations and a form to write out your Individualized Home Instruction Plan (IHIP).
  • Then the parents have four weeks or until August 15 (whichever is later) to fill out the IHIP and send it back.
  • The school then must accept the IHIP or notify the parent of a problem within ten business days or by August 31 (again, whichever is later).
  • Assuming the IHIP is approved, the parent must submit a quarterly report on student progress at four evenly-spaced intervals of their own choosing through the year.
  • At the end of the year, the parent must have the child’s progress assessed.

Whew! That feels like a lot to me, but I’m going to take it one step at a time. Right now I’m sending in my letter to the superintendent. It is VERY basic, and looks like this:

Superintendent’s Name,

We are sending this letter of intent as required of Section 100.10 of the Regulations of New York State Commissioner of Education.

We intend to homeschool our daughter, Child’s Name (DOB 00/00/0000), who will be entering grade K, for the 2014-2015 school year.

Sincerely,

Parents’ Names

Okay. Not bad, so far.

In a couple of weeks, I’ll get my IHIP. On the IHIP I will need to list a grade for the student. My daughter is six years old and doing first grade material, but I will list her as a kindergartener. The regulations say specifically that the child’s grade does not have to match their age. The required subjects for kindergarten are quite minimal (moreso than first grade) and with kindergarten and first grade becoming more unreasonably rigorous, and children’s development at these ages so asynchronous, I feel that it is best to give her that extra year. Since we tailor her schoolwork to where she is academically, she can move at her own pace. If needed, I can “skip” her ahead in a few years when it is clearer what her needs are.

I must list what we will do for each state-mandated subject. NY only requires these subjects in K:

(a) Patriotism and citizenship

            (b) health education regarding alcohol, drug, and tobacco misuse;

            (c) highway safety and traffic regulation, including bicycle safety; and

            (d) fire and arson prevention and safety.

After I file my IHIP and it is accepted, I will need to file four quarterly reports detailing how much we have covered, how well she did in each subject, and how many hours of “school” we did over that quarter.

Then, at the end of the year, we will need to submit an assessment. One method of assessment is standardized testing, but this is not required for children in grades K-3. The alternative is an assessment written by a “qualified individual” who is agreed upon between me and the school district. This sounds intimidating, but everyone I know has been allowed to assess their own child, so hopefully it won’t be too bad!

Angela is raising a daughter and twin sons in a tiny city in Central New York.  She and her wife, Kelly, hope to travel more when the children are a bit older. She enjoys gardening, furniture refinishing, and making miles upon miles of lists.

Testing and Record-Keeping in a Minimally Regulated State, by Cheryl

 

What do you do when nothing (or little) is required of you?

The Oklahoma State Constitution provides protection for the right of parents to homeschool their children. The Attorney General qualified that right by stating “so long as the private instruction is supplied in good faith and equivalent in fact to that afforded by the State.” “Equivalency” has never been established. The compulsory school age is over 5 and under 18, and 180 days of instruction must be completed in a year. The following subjects must be taught: math, writing, reading, citizenship, U.S. Constitution, health, science, P.E., safety, and conservation. Although this is all required, we report to no one. No one looks at our attendance chart or our grade records. (For a full evaluation of the laws affecting homeschools in Oklahoma, visit the OCHEC website* or HSLDA’s page on Oklahoma Regulations.)

*The OCHEC website includes a withdrawal form for children who have been in public school previously.

If your child has never been enrolled in public school, as of the publishing of this article, there is nothing you must do in this state.

With no one to report to,and no required records to maintain, there is great freedom — but should you really do nothing? Should you just forego record keeping all together? In my opinion, no. Why?

1. It is good to keep some sort of record to track your child’s progress. It is also fun to go back and compare their work from previous years to see how they have grown. In addition, laws can change or you could face a move to a more highly-regulated state. It is good to be in the habit of keeping some records.

Lilly at the microscoper

3. If your child is interested in attending college, you will need records of work at the high school level that fulfills the admission requirements for the school. By keeping records throughout the child’s school career, it will be a less daunting task when you reach high school.

Aidan doing Math

I keep three types of records for our school. The first is simply to keep all work completed in a year. We date our work and everything goes in one box at the end of the year. The second is a photographic record of the kids on field trips and working at home. The third is one standardized test at the end of each year. (I have played around with several online and paper planners for maintaining records. For elementary school–for me and the way we run our homeschool–they are not a good fit. When we reach middle school or logic stage work, I plan to add an online planner to our record keeping.)

making a lapbook

Why do I test if it is not required? For my peace of mind. That is the only reason. I start testing when my kids are at a first grade level or above in reading and math. I order my tests through Seton Testing. The tests are inexpensive, and the company has provided quick service every year we have used them. Scores are posted to your online account for a quick turnaround time.

I have used the CAT/E or CAT Survey for 1st and 2nd grade and the CogAT for 3rd and will use it again for 4th/5th grade testing. I like these tests because they only test math, reading, and language abilities, not science or social studies. Since we follow the classical method as laid out in The Well-Trained Mind, we do four-year history and science cycles. What we study does not line up with what is taught in most public and private schools in the lower elementary (or grammar) stage. I just want to see how my kids are doing in the basics of math and language.

I do not test for the “grade” my child is in, or the “grade” they would be in if enrolled in public school. I select the test for the level at which my child works. My son took the first grade CAT/E when in “kindergarten” because he was working on first grade math and reading. This year he has made a huge leap and we will test at a 5th grade level (last year we did 3rd). My daughter is in kindergarten, working at a kindergarten level, so we will not test this year. Next year we will start with a first grade test. You will not gain any information about your child’s growth and development if you test too far below or above their level. (This advice is meant only for states where testing is NOT mandated; if testing is required, follow the regulations for your state.)

One side benefit of testing when it is not required: If anyone were to question the education of my children, I have tests that show they are at or above the level of their peers. Another side benefit is that they have practice taking standardized tests in a low-stress environment. My hope is that they will be very comfortable with testing by the time they start taking college admissions tests.

When nothing is required of you, you must be more self-motivated. You must set the standards you want for yourself and your children.

 

CherylcherylCheryl is a singing, dancing, baking, homeschooling mom of three. She has danced her whole life and taught ballet and theatre for most of her adult life. Her favorite pastime has always been cooking and baking, and as a Pampered Chef Independent Consultant she gets to share that love with others. Home educating her three children has been and continues to be one of her greatest learning experiences! It is an adventure she is ready to continue.

Seen Around the Web: Homeschooling in Highly Regulated States


Megan has compiled a list of links to begin your research on homeschooling laws in your state, and Cheryl has shared her best advice for recordkeeping in a minimally-reporting state. The editors at StS decided we should also offer some record-keeping insight for those living in more stringent states, but most of our team do not live in those areas of the country so we can’t write authoritatively about them. Our solution is to bring you the best from-the-horse’s-mouth information we can find online, shared by generous homeschool bloggers who live under more regulation than the rest of us. We hope you will enjoy this little Blog Hop! We are delighted to meet these bloggers, journalists, and organizations, and we thank them for sharing their skill and knowledge with us all.

Florida

Getting Started and FAQ’s by Homeschool in Florida

How to Make a Homeschool Portfolio by Parkridge Church Homeschoolers

Requirements by Florida Parent-Educators Association (FPEA)

Vitarete Academy is a new homeschooling umbrella organization that is registered as a private school in the state of Florida

Maryland

Preparing a Maryland Homeschool Portfolio by Tinderbox

Getting Started Homeschooling by the Maryland Homeschool Association

Homeschooling in Maryland by The Homeschool Mom

Pennsylvania

Start with the Homeschool Forms page, but then read everything at Ask Pauline!

Affadavits, Objectives, and Samples, Oh, My! by StS contributor Nance at HOME’S COOL

New York

Homeschooler by The Journey Mom

Homeschooling: Homemade Education by Sarah Berson for METRO FOCUS at thirteen.org

New York State Homeschooling Regulations Simplified by New York Adventures in Homeschooling

Homeschooling in New York by Angela for Sandbox to Socrates

North Dakota

North Dakota Homeschool Association at www.homeschool-life.com

Homeschooling in North Dakota by The Homeschool Mom

 

 

Planning For High School, by Lisa Appelo

 

Whether you’re just starting out or you’ve been homeschooling kids since kindergarten, thinking about homeschooling through the high school years is daunting. What records will you need? Can lab sciences and pre-calc really be done at home? Even though thousands of other homeschoolers have graduated and gone on to successful post-high school experiences, it can still seem like a grand experiment until you’ve graduated your own child.

I have found there are five keys to high school planning. Follow these to curb misgivings and missteps.

1. Start with the end in mind. Before you look through the first catalog, sit down with your child and talk about post-high school goals. Does your child prefer a large state university or a small liberal arts college? Will she likely go into the service or to a vocational school? While not immoveable, knowing the end goal will help you shape the high school years.

In our family, we knew our children would most likely go to a state university because of their career goals and an excellent state scholarship program. With that in mind, we looked at two things: the state universities’ admission requirements and any special homeschool conditions. One university required homeschoolers to take several accredited courses, or alternatively, SAT II exams in those subject areas. Armed with that information, we were able to fold in accredited classes over the high school years. It would have been a major roadblock had we discovered this during the senior year admissions process!

Once you know your student’s post-high school vision, you’re almost ready to open the catalogs. But first, pause and reassure yourself with step 2.

2. Just take the next step from 8th grade. Moving into high school is much like moving a child from kindergarten to first grade or from 6th grade to 7th. While high school may seem like promotion to a whole new world, the student is just progressing up one step academically. For many core subjects, this simply means going to the next level in that subject. In math, for example, the student might move from Saxon Algebra I to Algebra II. If you already have favorite curricula, some of it can be used right into high school.

Even the schedules and learning style you found in the middle years can be used in high school. Thinking of just going up one level, rather than creating a whole new structure, will help take the angst out of high school planning.

3. Research state graduation requirements. In most states, homeschoolers are not bound by state graduation requirements. But these standards help indicate two key things: what colleges in your area are looking for and what credits graduates will have taken — graduates in the same college application pool as yours. If graduates in your area routinely take four years of core academic subjects (math, science, social science, language arts and foreign language), you will want your student’s transcript to reflect that as well.

Also, while most college admission sites list the minimum requirements, be sure to look at the freshman profile page. This page gives a picture of the test scores, GPA, and credits for the freshman class actually admitted and attending. At this point, you’re ready to make the four-year plan, only in light of Step 4.

4. Sketch a four-year plan. In pencil. Now that you know your child’s goals, what worked in eighth grade, and your state’s requirements, you’re ready to rough out a four-year plan. Go ahead and add in details like curriculum you might use or online classes that would fit. Be sure to write in tests that should be completed along with courses (AP, CLEP or SAT II) as well as tests necessary for dual-enrollment and college (PSAT, SAT, ACT).

Now is the time to get out the catalogs and dream big! Just remember that this draft will change. Before your child graduates, new books will be published. Outside classes and local opportunities will appear. Or your student may develop a new passion. Of course, the beauty of homeschooling — sometimes most clearly seen in the high school years — is being able to tailor learning to our children. Even in pencil, this sketch will provide a great scaffold for the next four years. Just one more thing to add:

5. Consult a local source. This is my favorite part because it usually means I get to take another  homeschool mom out to lunch. Choose someone who has already put kids through high school and is familiar with state requirements. Ask her if she sees any problems with your four-year plan. In the best of worlds, this parent will share the transcripts, planning forms and tried-and-true wisdom learned from the process.

Planning for the high school years does not need to be intimidating. Even for those completely new to home education, these five practical steps will get you started and help you craft a plan for your high schooler. And be sure to stay tuned, as Sandbox to Socrates will cover the high school years in more detail in October.

Lisa Appelo is in the 16th year of homeschooling her seven children. The oldest three were homeschooled through high school and went on to their first choice colleges. Lisa continues to teach the others in grades 2nd through high school at home, most recently as a suddenly widowed single mom. Each day is an adventure in life and grace.

In the Age of High-Stakes Testing, How Do I Know if My Child Measures Up? by Cheryl

One of my biggest fears as a homeschool mom has been that my children will be “behind.” Behind what? Behind where the public school system says they should be? This fear plagues the minds of many new homeschool parents. The school systems have numerous fancy tests to check a child’s progress, but is this really the best way to evaluate a child? In the past few months the debate surrounding the reading test for Oklahoma third graders has been anything but pretty. One test was to determine if a third grader would be promoted to fourth grade.

With the adoption of Common Core in many states, the high-stakes testing is getting worse. If this is how the schools are monitoring a child’s progress, is this what homeschoolers should do, too? I do test my kids once a year when they are at or above a first grade math and reading level. I use a product that only tests language and math skills. Before we test, I have an idea of how my child will perform because I have been evaluating them all year.

The nature of homeschooling allows for constant monitoring of your child’s progress. But how do you really know? I have listed a few of the methods I use to evaluate my children in various subjects.

Reading: My children read aloud to me daily. I ask questions about what they have read. For my oldest, some days we read out of a McGuffey reader, and most days he reads his grammar lesson to me and then we discuss. If you want to check for decoding abilities, reading aloud is the best method to test. For comprehension, ask your child to narrate what they just read. (With narration, after they read they tell you what they read.) Another less intrusive testing method is emotional response. If your child is reading alone and begins to laugh at a funny book or cry at a sad one, you’ll know they are gaining comprehension. I have watched my eight-year-old laugh at many books he reads. It gives me great joy to see him react to a book!

Math: After working together on a topic, I send my oldest to work alone. After I check his work, we rework any problems he missed. We retouch on topics as we do the built-in reviews. If one type of problem is missed more than I think it should be, we go back to that topic. If a child struggles on advanced topics, it is a good bet that some more basic skill is lacking. Review and then try again.

Spelling and Grammar: These subjects are some of the easiest to test. Look at what your child writes during non-school hours. You will see what is carrying over. I also do dictation three days a week to practice spelling and punctuation. I recite sentences or paragraphs using words we have studied in spelling and punctuation we have covered in grammar. We discuss mistakes and then try another sentence or paragraph.

Science and History: Talk to your kids and listen to what they want to tell you. My son will talk my ear off about a science topic that interests him. I know what he is retaining when he talks to me or creates books about a topic. After a chapter on magnets in Physics, it has become his favorite topic. I have let him run with it.

photo-31-e1400775634175
My eight-year-old made this book for fun. I can see that we need to work on capitalization and punctuation, but his knowledge of magnets is far beyond what I expected.

I combine formal evaluation with much less formal evaluation methods. As I work with my kids daily, I learn their strengths and weaknesses. The one-on-one focus that homeschooling gives parents make the evaluation of skills simple.

Test if you want, but don’t let the pressure of the tests used in schools add stress to your homeschool. The tests should be treated as one tool of many in our education process. You will know your kids are learning. I struggled with this idea as it is a hard shift to make in one’s thinking about education, but you will see it and you will be amazed by what their minds can do!

 

Cherylcheryl–Cheryl is a singing, dancing, baking, homeschooling mom of three. She has danced her whole life and taught ballet and theatre for most of her adult life. Her favorite pastime has always been cooking and baking, and as a Pampered Chef Independent Consultant she gets to share that love with others. Home educating her three children has been and continues to be one of her greatest learning experiences! It is an adventure she is ready to continue.

Getting Started: Choosing Curriculum, by Sarah

 

You’ve finally decided that you will homeschool your child. There are hundreds of reasons that may have brought you to this point, but here you stand, about to start.

I’m a planner so I like to know what curricula I will be using to teach my child, at least to start. Since we are eclectic classical homeschoolers that means I did a lot of research to figure out what I thought would be a good choice. I was completely wrong about most of my original choices, but I still did a lot of research before deciding on all the wrong books.

That is probably the first thing to remember when choosing a curriculum and planning the subjects you will study with your new homeschooler: you will occasionally be wrong. You will think that XYZ looks super exciting and is something your child will love, only to end up with your child despising the book and everything related to it. It happens to everyone at some point, even to experienced homeschoolers.

This brings me to the second thing to remember: just because it looks good on paper doesn’t mean it will work for your family. Often, something you purchase even though you have doubts about it ends up working far better than the curriculum you were absolutely certain about. I chose Singapore Math for my son. He is good at math, and I really liked how SM taught math. I figured it would work great. I was wrong. My son was not happy with my choice; it was too much busy work for him and he tried to get out of math every day. I then bought Life of Fred thinking it would be a nice supplement. My son loved Life of Fred; it suited his learning style a lot better, and he was much happier doing a chapter of Fred each day rather than a couple pages of Singapore.

This leads to the third thing to remember: be flexible. Sometimes you will have to change plans midstream. The “perfect curriculum” ends up being a paperweight instead of the repository of knowledge you hoped it would be. This can be painful since some curricula are costly, and money spent for something that doesn’t work can hurt your financial plan for the year. Fortunately there are some cheaper options out there, but having spent $100 or more for something for the year only to figure out it was a bad match for your child can be painful, especially for your wallet.

Look for samples to check out the material before buying. It’s no guarantee, but it can be helpful. Another good option is to enlist your child’s help in deciding what to use. If you are undecided between two or three things, ask your child to look at them with you. He may see something in one that makes it his top choice — or his bottom choice. This also works well when you are not sure what subset of a subject you should teach. Asking your children what they are interested in or knowing their interests can make it easier when you are trying to decide between chemistry or physical science or biology.

Lastly, getting information and opinions from homeschooling friends, local groups, and online sites can help cut down on bad choices. I found a number of resources when researching. The Well-Trained Mind message boards were extremely helpful, as were Facebook groups. Seeing various options in person, either because a friend brought it over or I saw it at a curriculum fair, helped as well since I could actually evaluate the physical product. I will admit that even with these resources, I did make a few bad choices for my son, but they also aided me in finding a better replacement.

The main things to remember when researching and choosing curriculum are that you need to be flexible, you need to do your research, and in the end you need to be willing to admit something was a mistake and start over. I have done my research for the coming year for both my son and my daughter who will be starting Kindergarten. I am hoping that most of my choices for my son will work since they are just a continuation of what we have been using, but I am well aware that my choices for my daughter will likely end up being tweaked as we discover together what works for her and what does not. Also remember if your choices do not work out, there’s always next year to find a better fit for your child as you learn together what works best while continuing on your homeschooling journey.

 

SarahsarahSarah is the wife of Dan and mom to Desmond, Eloise and Sullivan (Sully).  She enjoys reading,  board games, D&D, computer and console games, the Oxford comma, and organizing fun trips. Sarah and Dan decided years before they had children that they would be homeschooling and now they are. Their family has enjoyed beginning their homeschooling journey and the early elementary years. There are a lot of fun opportunities upcoming in the next year as well, including Eloise starting Kindergarten at home, numerous trips to Atlanta, and a month long trip to India. They currently reside in a suburb of Washington DC and enjoy all the local attractions available for day trips.