Memoria Press Review by Cheryl: Timeline

Memoria Press’ Timeline program includes a Handbook outlining the program and containing summaries of each event. The summaries are used to help the students complete their Composition and Sketchbook. For each event the Composition and Sketchbook contains a blank page for students to illustrate the event and a notebooking page to record important information about the event. Student Flashcards are used to help students memorize dates, and Wall Cards are hung as a visual reminder of the order of events. The full package retails for $39.95.

I fell in love with the idea of memorizing a history timeline when I first began studying the classical method. Memorizing historical events in order as reference for later studies made sense to me. We tried a different timeline for two years, but I found it too cumbersome. We spent hours of our week trying to memorize the numerous events. About a third of the way through, we dropped it to make more time for our other studies. When I opened up the Memoria Press Timeline I was pleasantly surprised by the number of items to memorize, only half of what we had been trying to remember previously. It is doable without being the main focus of our school.

Each year builds on the previous year’s memory work. My oldest is in third grade. Third graders are only required to memorize eleven events. Fourth graders review the original eleven items and an additional twenty for a total of thirty-one events. Fifth graders memorize forty-two events and sixth grade students memorize all sixty events.

I used the curriculum with my third grader, and my kindergartener tagged along. We memorized two items each week. The handbook contains the answers that should be written on the student composition page. I used the handbook answers as a quick review of the event. Later in the week I had my kindergartener complete the sketch page (because she is my artist) and my eight year old the composition page (because he is my writer but does not enjoy drawing). I don’t have a place on the wall to use the wall cards right now, but the flash cards were great for a quick daily review.

My kids found the timeline activities fun and easy. I love the simplicity of the curriculum. It is an excellent supplement to any history program.

*Memoria press is a Christian company. The timeline begins with Creation. The five Biblical events could easily be skipped if you are looking for a secular timeline.

Be sure to read what our other reviewers had to say about this and other Memoria Press products.

I received a free copy of this product in exchange for my honest review on the Sandbox to Socrates blog. Opinions expressed in this review are the opinions of myself or my family and do not necessarily reflect those of the Sandbox to Socrates blog. I received no compensation for this review, nor was I required to write a positive review. This disclosure is in accordance with the FTC Regulations.

cheryl

Cheryl–Cheryl is a singing, dancing, baking, homeschooling mom of three. She has danced her whole life and taught ballet and theatre for most of her adult life. Her favorite pastime has always been cooking and baking, and as a Pampered Chef Independent Consultant she gets to share that love with others. Home educating her three children has been and continues to be one of her greatest learning experiences! It is an adventure she is ready to continue.

Memoria Press Review by Lynne: Geography I

Our family had the opportunity to review the Geography I curriculum from Memoria Press. Memoria Press includes this program in their fourth grade curriculum.  You can purchase the Geography portion for $48.  I used it with my fourth- and fifth-grade sons.

Geography I covers the Middle East, North Africa, and Europe.  It also includes a review booklet for the United States.  We’ve always done geography in conjunction with history, and not as a separate subject, so I was interested to see how this would work for us.

The Student Text begins each section with a brief overview and map of the region.  The regional information is followed by a two-page spread for each country in the region.  You can see a sample of this layout on MP’s website.  The first page is broken down into three sections:  History’s Headlines, where we get highlights of the country’s past; Tour of Today, where we learn of events from the not-so-distant past; and Fast Facts, where we get the stats about the country and learn about its flag.  There are also black-and-white pictures to accompany each country. The second page is a basic map showing the country in relation to its surrounding countries and bodies of water. In the back of the book, there are several colorful pages of flags.  My kids were very interested in the flags, so I actually found them some flag stickers that they could put on each page.

The Geography I Student Workbook has a page for each country for the students to label a few of the major geographical locations and to record some basic information about the country.  You can see a sample page here.  The answers are provided in the Teacher Guide.

The United States Student Workbook breaks the country into eight regions.  For each region, there are worksheet pages to identify the name of the state and its capital.  We had never done a formal study of United States geography, so I was surprised when my kids just whipped through the United States booklet.  They informed me that they learned the states and capitals through various educational video games.

I normally choose secular materials for my kids, but I have used other MP items and have not found them to be overbearing in their religious viewpoint.  If you want no mention of God or Christianity at all in your curriculum. though, this is not the program for you.

As a preliminary foray into Geography, I don’t think you’ll find a more simple and easy product to use.  It provides a good overview of the various regions and what countries make up those regions.  The text is brief and simple, but you could easily do more independent research on a country that strikes your fancy.  The maps are clear and simple and provide a good sense of the main points of interest.  My kids enjoyed using these books, so we have decided to continue on with Geography II next year.  Once again, though, I will cut off the binding and have the workbooks spiral bound.  My kids do not like trying to hold a book flat while writing in it.  I just photocopied the workbook pages so they could lay them flat until I was able to spiral bind the book.

Be sure to read what our other reviewers had to say about this and other Memoria Press products.

Disclaimer:  I received a free copy of this product in exchange for my honest review on the Sandbox to Socrates blog. Opinions expressed in this review are the opinions of myself or my family and do not necessarily reflect those of the Sandbox to Socrates blog. I received no compensation for this review, nor was I required to write a positive review. This disclosure is in accordance with the FTC Regulations.

  lynneby Lynne –Lynne has enjoyed homeschooling her two sons for the past three years, after their brief stint in the local public school.  Her older son is a humorous fellow with high functioning autism who thrives in a home education environment.  Her younger son is a sensitive soul with a great deal of patience. The boys, Mom, and Dad, along with the two guinea pigs, live in Northeast Ohio.  Lynne holds a Master’s Degree in French Language and Literature.  She is also a Harry Potter fanatic, enjoys line dancing and Zumba, spends hours scrapbooking, and loves organic vegetables.  You can visit her soon-to-be revitalized blog at www.daysofwonderhomeschool.blogspot.com.

Memoria Press Review by Nakia: Geography I

I reviewed Geography 1 from Memoria Press. This three-book set (student text, student workbook, and teacher guide) covers The Middle East, North Africa, and Europe. The entire course covers 53 countries. I used this product with a 5th grader and an 8th grader.

Photo by Flavio Takemoto

After an introduction, the student text begins with a brief survey of each region and then focuses on individual countries. For each country, there is a one-page summary and a fully-labeled black and white map on the facing page. The summary for each country includes a historical reference section called “History’s Headlines” and some “Fast Facts” (such as capital city, population, and flag description). The facts listed are interesting, if a bit brief. I would have preferred more historical background information to provide context, as one of the goals listed on the Memoria Press website for this course is “deepening his understanding of both the past and the present.” Each summary page also includes one or two black-and-white photographs. In the back of the student text are full-color illustrations of each country’s flag.

The student workbook features a black-and-white map for the student to label along with a fill-in-the-blank worksheet for the student to complete.  Answers to the worksheet can be found in the student text. A word bank for use with the map is provided for the student. There is a review page after each region where students are asked to fill in the country and capital and label a blank map. Students are encouraged to “pay close attention to correct spelling” which is always a great reminder and much appreciated by homeschool parents!

After a brief introduction with recommendations for scheduling the course, the teacher guide includes all answers to the student workbook along with completed maps. This is definitely welcome and helpful to the parent/teacher.

This geography course is a good tool for learning and memorizing countries and capitals and their locations. I appreciate the opportunity to review this product.

Be sure to read what our other reviewers had to say about this and other Memoria Press products.

Disclaimer:  I received a free copy of this product in exchange for my honest review on the Sandbox to Socrates blog. Opinions expressed in this review are the opinions of myself or my family and do not necessarily reflect those of the Sandbox to Socrates blog. I received no compensation for this review, nor was I required to write a positive review. This disclosure is in accordance with the FTC Regulations.

nakia

Nakia–Nakia is a Southern girl, born and raised in North Carolina. She is married to her high school sweetheart and is in her 9th year of homeschooling her three wonderful daughters. She works part time as a nurse and loves photography, thrift shopping, baking, and autumn in the mountains.

Memoria Press Review by Emma: Timeline

I was recently given the opportunity to review the Memoria Press Timeline curriculum. We are history nuts, here and love almost everything Memoria Press, so I was really looking forward to working with the materials. I received Wall Cards, Flash Cards, Handbook and the Composition and Sketchbook.

The Wall Cards and Flash Cards are made of heavy card stock and have white words printed on a dark background, making them easy to read. The Composition and Sketchbook has just the right amount of space for summarizing what was learned. The Handbook contains a brief summary of each moment in history.

This program was a great way to review previous history learned, and to start to build a sense of when things happened during history. We went through one card every couple of days, just reading through the notations in the Handbook, then we’d find the corresponding cards and hang the Wall Card on our Timeline. After that, my son would fill out the pertaining section in the Composition and Sketchbook.

Pros: Easy to use, good quality materials, great selection of moments in history.

Cons: There were a lot of pieces to the program, and it was a bit hard to keep up with all of them. It’s one of those programs that are easy to forget to use during busy weeks. Images next to each event would make the Wall Cards more interesting.

Conclusion: We will continue to use the program as review, although I was only able to use the program twice during our studies due to the period in history we are covering. I intend to schedule this into our week and think it will be an interesting addition to our history studies.

Be sure to read what our other reviewers had to say about this and other Memoria Press products.

Disclaimer I received a free copy of this product in exchange for my honest review on the Sandbox to Socrates blog. Opinions expressed in this review are the opinions of myself or my family and do not necessarily reflect those of the Sandbox to Socrates blog. I received no compensation for this review, nor was I required to write a positive review. This disclosure is in accordance with the FTC Regulations.

emma

Emma–Emma has been married for seven years, and is mom of two, plus one once-crazy dog. She’s been homeschooling for three years now in NC. In addition to being a wife, mom and educator, she is also a Graphic Designer.

Memoria Press Review by Emma: United States Geography

We are currently studying American History, and so I wanted to introduce a study of the states to our lesson time. Memoria PressThe United States curriculum has been a great supplement to our studies.

Once a week, my eight-year-old son would sit down to do a lesson in the workbook. After completing the lesson, he’d bring it to me, and I would check the answers in the Teacher’s Manual. This curriculum is basic and to-the-point, but effective.

▪Pros:  The curriculum can be done independently, which has been hugely helpful lately. It also has a bit of hands-on in the form of coloring, which my son enjoys.

▪Cons:  Other than the fact that I wish there was more color and visual appeal, there aren’t many negatives. This curriculum is strictly meant to teach about the states, capitals, etc., and it accomplishes that very well.

Conclusion:  I plan to continue using The United States and will follow it up with States and Capitals once finished.

Be sure to read what our other reviewers had to say about this and other Memoria Press products.

Disclaimer:  I received a free copy of this product in exchange for my honest review on the Sandbox to Socrates blog. Opinions expressed in this review are the opinions of myself or my family and do not necessarily reflect those of the Sandbox to Socrates blog. I received no compensation for this review, nor was I required to write a positive review. This disclosure is in accordance with the FTC Regulations.

emma

Emma–Emma has been married for seven years, and is mom of two, plus one once-crazy dog. She’s been homeschooling for three years now in NC. In addition to being a wife, mom and educator, she is also a Graphic Designer.

Memoria Press Review by Tamara: First Form Latin

We used First Form Latin with my dyslexic seventh grader (thirteen years old). We had previously used several other Latin curricula, including Song School Latin, I Speak Latin, and Visual Latin. We always hit a wall a few months into our studies, as none of these programs had a solid base in grammar and conjugation. While Nate enjoyed Visual Latin greatly, it is a translation-based program. New words are given each week, then the student is asked to translate a passage. The first few lessons are amazing, and he was so excited to be reading and understanding simple Latin sentences right off the bat. But without the base of verb conjugation and sentence construction, it is difficult to advance very far. Several times we had to backtrack a few lessons and try to see where we had missed the pieces we needed to advance.

First Form Latin is not as “exciting” in the beginning, as it is more dependent on rote memorization of grammar, vocabulary, and verb forms. It doesn’t feature the quick translation of “whole language”-based Latin programs. But I have been astonished at the thoroughness and depth of his understanding of Latin, even in the short month we have been using it. More than just understanding the “what” of Latin, Nate is now understanding the “why.” For a student with dyslexia, this is very helpful. He has had to memorize many rules in reading English, as he only understands spelling by understanding the rules. Latin, and specifically a grammar-based program, seems especially suited for the dyslexic learner. Unlike English words, Latin words follow regular rules and pronunciations. Nate has been delighted to know that all he truly has to do is “sound out” the letters and they always follow logical rules of pronunciation.

First Form Latin is a very in-depth program for a junior high student. It looks deceptively easy, as the lessons only cover a couple pages and a short video. But the workbook pages require quite a bit of drilling and really help cement the conjugations in place. The flashcards were a lifesaver. We made up several games to practice vocabulary. My son really likes the teacher on the videos as well. He has a quick, dry wit and Nate really liked him.

Because of Nate’s dyslexia, memorization is more difficult for him. For this reason, we slowed down the program somewhat. The TG suggests doing one lesson per week in the following way:  M– watch video, T- read text, W- do workbook pages, Th– review, F- quiz. This was too fast for him and didn’t allow him enough drill to solidify his learning. So we modified the schedule to meet his needs. We spaced each lesson out over two weeks.  Wk 1:  M– video, T– text, WThF – worksheets (2 each day). Wk 2: MTW- flashcard drill/games/review,  Th– quiz, F- grade quiz and rewrite any missed answers.

I highly recommend this program to anyone wanting to give their child a solid foundation in Latin. In fact, I enjoyed the program so much that I purchased an extra workbook for myself and have been doing it along with my son.  It also includes diagramming sentences in Latin, so we have put a hold on our English grammar for a while and are just using the Latin grammar.

Be sure to read what our other reviewers had to say about this and other Memoria Press products.

Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this product in exchange for my honest review on the Sandbox to Socrates blog. Opinions expressed in this review are the opinions of myself or my family and do not necessarily reflect those of the Sandbox to Socrates blog. I received no compensation for this review, nor was I required to write a positive review. This disclosure is in accordance with the FTC Regulations.

by Tamara –  Tamara is a proud Kansas City native who was transplanted to Texas thirteen years ago. She has three boys and three girls, and is currently in her seventh year of homeschooling. Several of her children have struggled with dyslexia, dyscalculia, dysgraphia, and other learning challenges. She tells them often that God must have something amazing for them in the future, as they are learning perseverance now.

Memoria Press Review by Darla: Geography I

I received in my package a teacher’s manual for Geography I, a student text, a student workbook, tests and quizzes, and a review of 50 states. The goal of this program is to familiarize your young learner with countries and their capitals. It is not meant to be an in-depth study of world cultures, so if you’re looking for something to take the place of history for a year and give you some deep learning to spend several hours a week on, this is not it. It would make a good jumping-off point in my opinion, however, and more could easily be added per your student’s interest level.

This is a Christian publisher, so secular users will want to know that when covering areas of the Holy Land Biblical accounts are treated as fact. This is a given with any Christian publisher as far as I know. This led us to some discussion on what archaeologists are able to discover vs. various historical accounts and how they don’t always agree.

Onward to how the program works! Each country has a two-page spread in the text, and a correlating one-page exercise in the student workbook. The exercises are mostly map work. On a good day, geography can be done in about fifteen minutes if you cover one country at a time. The student is asked to read the text, label the map, copy the name of the country and its capital three times and add in some facts that he found interesting. Covering two or three countries a week will be a good pace for most families.

We had never really done the 50 states, so the review package sort of wasn’t review for my student. Somehow, he knows the states better than I expected and is moving along nicely on learning the capitals. He is ten years old, and we do keep maps up which have always interested him. It’s been enough.

The only improvement I would not mind seeing would be a separate pamphlet (or download) for quizzes and tests. They are included in the teacher manual which makes them a bit difficult to use.

We are looking forward to Geography II next!

Be sure to read what our other reviewers had to say about this and other Memoria Press products.

Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this product in exchange for my honest review on the Sandbox to Socrates blog. Opinions expressed in this review are the opinions of myself or my family and do not necessarily reflect those of the Sandbox to Socrates blog. I received no compensation for this review, nor was I required to write a positive review. This disclosure is in accordance with the FTC Regulations.

by Darla