Do babies get hospitalized for flu?

Each year, millions of children get sick with seasonal flu; thousands of children are hospitalized, and some children die from flu. Children commonly need medical care because of flu, especially children younger than 5 years old.

When should I take my baby to the hospital for the flu?

Take your child to a doctor right away or call for an ambulance if your child has any of the warning signs: fast breathing or trouble breathing. bluish or gray skin colour. not drinking enough fluids (and not passing as much urine as they normally do)

How dangerous is the flu for babies?

Although all children younger than 5 years old are considered at high risk for complications from flu, the highest risk is for those younger than 2 years old, with the highest hospitalization and death rates among infants younger than 6 months old.

How are infants treated for flu?

HOW IS THE FLU TREATED IN BABIES? Children younger than 2 years old will often need to be treated with medicine that fights off the flu virus. This is called antiviral medicine. The medicine works best if started within 48 hours after symptoms begin, if possible.

IT IS INTERESTING:  Can a big baby cause high amniotic fluid?

What if my infant gets the flu?

If your baby has any of these signs and symptoms of the flu, call his health care provider right away or take him to see his provider:

  1. Being very tired or sleepy (also called fatigue)
  2. Cough.
  3. Fever (100 F or above), chills or body shakes. …
  4. Headache, or muscle or body aches.
  5. Runny or stuffy nose.
  6. Sore throat.

How long does the flu last in infants?

If your baby or toddler comes down with the flu, symptoms usually last about a week but can linger for up to two weeks. The associated cough can sometimes last up to four weeks.

How do I know if my child’s flu is serious?

Symptoms that call for immediate medical care are if a child’s breathing becomes labored, and he or she is taking fast, shallow breaths or feels chest pain or pressure; if the child’s lips turn blue or purple; if he or she is less responsive than usual; if the child’s skin becomes clammy; or if the child refuses to eat …

How can I protect my 4 month old from the flu?

6 Ways to Protect Your Baby During Cold and Flu Season

  1. Be on high alert for the first two months. …
  2. Keep your baby covered when in public places. …
  3. Always carry disinfecting wipes and hand sanitizer. …
  4. Enforce a strict “no sick guests allowed” policy. …
  5. Breastfeed if possible. …
  6. Get your shots.

9.01.2015

Can infants get sick from flu shot?

Side Effects of the Flu Vaccine for Babies

IT IS INTERESTING:  How do I get my child to stop kicking her duvet off?

That said, your baby may experience mild side effects, including low-grade fever, aches, and soreness or redness near the injection site. These symptoms only last a day or two. Serious allergic reactions (usually attributed to egg protein in the shot) are rare.

How can I treat my baby’s flu at home?

Lifestyle and home remedies

  1. Offer plenty of fluids. Liquids are important to avoid dehydration. …
  2. Thin the mucus. Your baby’s doctor may recommend saline nose drops to loosen thick nasal mucus. …
  3. Suction your baby’s nose. Keep your baby’s nasal passages clear with a rubber-bulb syringe. …
  4. Moisten the air.

What can I give my 3 month old baby for flu?

Some good options are rice, crackers, toast, soup, and bananas.

  • Use a humidifier to help with nasal congestion. …
  • To help relieve fever in infants 0-2 years, use Infants’ TYLENOL® Fever and Sore Throat Pain Concentrated Drops or Infant’s TYLENOL® Drops.

Does breast milk protect baby from flu?

A mother’s breast milk contains antibodies and other immunological factors that can help protect her infant from flu and is the recommended source of nutrition for the infant, even while the mother is ill.

Can I breastfeed if I have flu?

Yes, you can keep breastfeeding your baby, even if you take antiviral medicines for flu-like symptoms. A mother’s breast milk is custom-made for her baby, providing antibodies that babies need to fight infection. So, continuing to breastfeed can protect your baby from the infection that your body is fighting.

Mom Share