About Homeschooling, Education is a Life, Uncategorized

Who’s Keeping Score?

Post on any social media group where homeschoolers gather and you’ll find plenty of advice for compiling a transcript and making sure that your child has the extracurriculars, standardized test scores, and all the rest of the hoops that college entrance requires. There are people out there like Mike Rowe, a famous example of someone who will tell you that college isn’t for everyone. I think that intuitively¬†parents sense that college may not be the right path for one or more of their children and trying to push them into it is stressful for everyone.

I guess what I want to address is the peer pressure aspect of it all. I would have loved to just keep my kids on a straight path like college attendance. Sure, we homeschooled them, but now they are going to be “normal” and go away to a four-year school like all our neighbors. This time of year it is especially in your face- dorm shopping sales, pictures of college campus visits on Facebook, and the curriculum catalogs that promise that if you buy their text, all will be well. Everyone still seems to assume that college attendance is the ideal and anything less is a failing on either the child or the parent for not inspiring them to attend.

I don’t want to dwell on my own family too much, for several reasons, one is this: what works for our family may not work for yours. Our family is full of fantastic academic under achievers, and that goes back at least three generations on both sides. We are a family of hands on specialists. We get going with something and don’t stop until we’ve conquered it. The traditional two years of Gen Ed classes can’t compete with starting life and getting good at your passion. I think if one of us had a career goal that required a degree he/she would do well at a university because of the requirement.

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I’ll use myself as an example. In my third grade, public school classroom my teacher had paper hot air balloons for each class member. As you completed quick math fact sheets, your balloon was raised higher on the wall until at the end of the year everyone else had their balloon on the ceiling while mine was very low to the ground. I didn’t care. I spent the end of math class writing stories and couldn’t care less about memorizing math facts. Coincidentally, part of math that year introduced calculators so it really seemed like a waste of time to learn facts that you could look up in seconds.

I’m not saying that learning or formal education is not necessary- it is. I just want to live in a world where more people pursue their passion and not just go through the motions and get a degree, graduating not having any idea what they want to devote their working years too. Many times that can be alleviated by taking a gap year and working at something. I’ve seen it go a couple ways. Either you discover that what you thought was a dream job isn’t or it is and now you are motivated to get qualified for that field.

In some ways, this is an introductory article to what I hope will be a series that tells the other side of homeschooling. We all hear about the academic over achievers getting accepted to fantastic schools. Statistically, and in my own experience I know that there are plenty of homeschool students who are average and who graduate high school going straight into the job market, trade apprenticeships, or Community College Certificate Programs.

 

 

 

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