CF: Why I Homeschool, Classical Foundations 2014

Why We Homeschool, by Jack Squid

 

“Mom, I want to be homeschooled like them,” my kids’ friend recently told her mother. “I want to be able to get up whenever I want like them, and to learn what I want rather than having the teacher tell me what to learn.”

Though we are indeed night owls who get up ridiculously late, our homeschool is all about hard work — hard work that is often enjoyable, but hard work nonetheless.

It’s easy to see why homeschooling sounds so appealing to my kids’ friend, however. At age seven, she is in first grade. A year ago, she was an inquisitive, happy child who wasn’t afraid to speak her mind. Now, she has been labeled a failure by the thought-quelling post-communist system. She doesn’t “get” the basic arithmetic concepts that are being presented to her, you see, and she is too creative. Though I think it is ridiculous to expect children to write whole essays during their first year in school, that is what is being expected of them. When this girl described spring as “sweet” in a recent essay, she was rewarded with the lowest grade. “Foods can be sweet; seasons cannot. Essay-writing is not the time to express artistic creativity,” the teacher told the child’s mother.

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I started homeschooling when my oldest child taught herself to read at age four. If she had lived in the country I grew up in, this is when she would have started school. Since school starts at seven here, I decided to start teaching her myself.

Homeschooling isn’t something I knew very much about at that point. A world opened up to me when I came across a great variety of English-language homeschool materials on the internet and found out that homeschooling isn’t all that unusual in America. Around the same time I learned more about the local school system and discovered The Well-Trained Mind. I knew that they couldn’t compare, and I wanted the better option.

We’ve skipped Latin and Greek so my kids could acquire some of the numerous languages that come with their own heritage instead, but I otherwise implement the sequence laid out in The Well-Trained Mind pretty closely.

My children will work on a math concept until they get it, rather than being written off as lazy or dreamers, like their friend. They enjoy chanting the full list of prepositions, rather than being told they must be creative and then being told off for it. They get to immerse themselves in history, rather than being the victim of recent historical events in their country of residence. After hard work they get to play and relax, rather than being faced with piles of homework.

I started homeschooling because I wanted to fill a need, committed to it due to more rigorous academics, and continue because it offers my kids freedom — freedom to delve deep, freedom to develop to their full potential, freedom to be themselves, and freedom to think and discuss their thoughts.

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